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Article:Witch-hunt
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m (Surplus word. ("The Gambia" is correct, "the Cameroon" is not.))
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[[File:Wickiana5.jpg|thumb|220px|Burning of three witches in [[Baden, Switzerland|Baden]], Switzerland (1585), by [[Johann Jakob Wick]].]]
 
[[File:Wickiana5.jpg|thumb|220px|Burning of three witches in [[Baden, Switzerland|Baden]], Switzerland (1585), by [[Johann Jakob Wick]].]]
   
A '''witch-hunt''' is a search for witches or evidence of [[witchcraft]], often involving [[moral panic]], [[mass hysteria]] and [[lynching]], but in historical instances also legally sanctioned and involving official '''witchcraft trials'''. The [[Witch trials in the Early Modern period|classical period of witchhunts]] in [[Early Modern Europe|Europe]] and [[Colonial North America|North America]] falls into the [[Early Modern period]] or about 1480 to 1750, spanning the upheavals of the [[Protestant Reformation|Reformation]] and the [[Thirty Years' War]], resulting in an estimated 40,000 to 60,000 executions.<ref name="ReferenceA">The most common estimates are between 40,000 and 60,000 deaths. [[Brian Levack]] (''The Witch Hunt in Early Modern Europe'') multiplied the number of known European witch trials by the average rate of conviction and execution, to arrive at a figure of around 60,000 deaths. [[Anne Lewellyn Barstow]] (''Witchcraze'') adjusted Levack's estimate to account for lost records, estimating 100,000 deaths. Ronald Hutton (''Triumph of the Moon'') argues that Levack's estimate had already been adjusted for these, and revises the figure to approximately 40,000.</ref>
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A '''witch-hunt''' is a search for witches or evidence of [[witchcraft]], often involving [[moral panic]], [[mass hysteria]] and [[lynching]], but in historical instances also legally sanctioned and involving official '''witchthis is so fake hahaha lame peoplecraft trials'''. The [[Witch trials in the Early Modern period|classical period of witchhunts]] in [[Early Modern Europe|Europe]] and [[Colonial North America|North America]] falls into the [[Early Modern period]] or about 1480 to 1750, spanning the upheavals of the [[Protestant Reformation|Reformation]] and the [[Thirty Years' War]], resulting in an estimated 40,000 to 60,000 executions.<ref name="ReferenceA">The most common estimates are between 40,000 and 60,000 deaths. [[Brian Levack]] (''The Witch Hunt in Early Modern Europe'') multiplied the number of known European witch trials by the average rate of conviction and execution, to arrive at a figure of around 60,000 deaths. [[Anne Lewellyn Barstow]] (''Witchcraze'') adjusted Levack's estimate to account for lost records, estimating 100,000 deaths. Ronald Hutton (''Triumph of the Moon'') argues that Levack's estimate had already been adjusted for these, and revises the figure to approximately 40,000.</ref>
   
 
The last executions of people convicted as witches in Europe took place in the 18th century. In the [[Kingdom of Great Britain]], witchcraft ceased to be an act punishable by law with the [[Witchcraft Act of 1735]]. In [[18th century history of Germany|Germany]], sorcery remained punishable by law into the late 18th century. Contemporary witch-hunts are reported from [[Sub-Saharan Africa]], [[India]] and [[Papua New Guinea]]. Official legislation against witchcraft is still found in [[Saudi Arabia]] and [[Cameroon]]. The term "[[:wikt:witch-hunt|witch-hunt]]" since the 1930s has also been in use as a metaphor to refer to moral panics in general (frantic persecution of perceived enemies). This usage is especially associated with the [[Second Red Scare]] of the 1950s (the [[McCarthyist]] persecution of [[communist]]s in the United States).
 
The last executions of people convicted as witches in Europe took place in the 18th century. In the [[Kingdom of Great Britain]], witchcraft ceased to be an act punishable by law with the [[Witchcraft Act of 1735]]. In [[18th century history of Germany|Germany]], sorcery remained punishable by law into the late 18th century. Contemporary witch-hunts are reported from [[Sub-Saharan Africa]], [[India]] and [[Papua New Guinea]]. Official legislation against witchcraft is still found in [[Saudi Arabia]] and [[Cameroon]]. The term "[[:wikt:witch-hunt|witch-hunt]]" since the 1930s has also been in use as a metaphor to refer to moral panics in general (frantic persecution of perceived enemies). This usage is especially associated with the [[Second Red Scare]] of the 1950s (the [[McCarthyist]] persecution of [[communist]]s in the United States).
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