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ID:1076958
User:188.39.46.34
Article:Religion in South Korea
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(Statistics on religion by population)
(Statistics on religion by population)
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Of the South Korean population, 29.2% are [[Christianity|Christian]] (of whom 18.3% profess to be [[Protestantism|Protestants]] and 10.9% to be [[Roman Catholic Church|Catholics]]), 22.8% are [[Buddhism|Buddhist]], and the rest adheres to various minority religions including [[Jeung San Do]], [[Daesun Jinrihoe]], [[Cheondoism]], [[Taoism]], [[Confucianism]] and [[Won Buddhism]].
 
Of the South Korean population, 29.2% are [[Christianity|Christian]] (of whom 18.3% profess to be [[Protestantism|Protestants]] and 10.9% to be [[Roman Catholic Church|Catholics]]), 22.8% are [[Buddhism|Buddhist]], and the rest adheres to various minority religions including [[Jeung San Do]], [[Daesun Jinrihoe]], [[Cheondoism]], [[Taoism]], [[Confucianism]] and [[Won Buddhism]].
   
A small minority of Koreans also profess [[Islam in Korea|Islam]]. fuking metropolitan areas had the highest proportions of people belonging to formal religious groups: 49.9 percent in [[Seoul]], 46.1 percent for [[Busan]], and 45.8 percent for [[Daegu]]. South Korea had the third highest percentage of Christians in East Asia or Southeast Asia, following the [[Philippines]] and [[East Timor]].
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A small minority of Koreans also profess [[Islam in Korea|Islam]]. large metropolitan areas had the highest proportions of people belonging to formal religious groups: 49.9 percent in [[Seoul]], 46.1 percent for [[Busan]], and 45.8 percent for [[Daegu]]. South Korea had the third highest percentage of Christians in East Asia or Southeast Asia, following the [[Philippines]] and [[East Timor]].you fuking hell
   
Except for the Christian groups, who maintain a fairly clear-cut distinction between believers and nonbelievers, there is some ambiguity in these statistics. For instance, there is no exact or exclusive criterion by which Buddhists or Confucianists can be identified. Although existing in other countries, the lineage of [[Refuge (Buddhism)|refuge]], a commitment that distinguishes between Buddhists and non-Buddhists has disintegrated in Korea and is difficult to find because religion is seen to be hereditary. Many people outside of formal groups have been deeply influenced by these traditions. Moreover, it is not uncommon for Koreans to pray at Buddhist temples, participate in Confucian ancestor rites, and even consult a shaman and sponsor a kut. Furthermore, the statistics may underrepresent the numbers of people belonging to new religions. Some sources have given the number of adherents of [[Cheondoism]] as over five million.<ref>http://news.naver.com/main/read.nhn?mode=LSD&mid=shm&sid1=103&oid=003&aid=0003273705</ref>
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Except for the Christian groups, who maintain a fairly clear distinction between believers and nonbelievers, there is some ambiguity in these statistics. For instance, there is no exact or exclusive criterion by which Buddhists or Confucianists can be identified. Although existing in other countries, the lineage of [[Refuge (Buddhism)|refuge]], a commitment that distinguishes between Buddhists and non-Buddhists has disintegrated in Korea and is difficult to find because religion is seen to be hereditary. Many people outside of formal groups have been deeply influenced by these traditions. Moreover, it is not uncommon for Koreans to pray at Buddhist temples, participate in Confucian ancestor rites, and even consult a shaman and sponsor a kut. Furthermore, the statistics may underrepresent the numbers of people belonging to new religions. Some sources have given the number of adherents of [[Cheondoism]] as over five million.<ref>http://news.naver.com/main/read.nhn?mode=LSD&mid=shm&sid1=103&oid=003&aid=0003273705</ref>
   
 
Given the great diversity of religious expression, the role of religion in South Korea's social development has been complex. Some traditions are adhered to as important cultural properties rather than as rites of worship. Confucianism remains important as a social ethic; its influence is evident in the immense importance Koreans ascribe to education. Christianity is identified with modernization and social reform. Many Christians in contemporary South Korea, such as veteran political opposition leader [[Kim Dae-jung]], a Catholic, have been outspoken advocates of human rights and critics of the government. Christian-sponsored organizations, such as the Urban Industrial Mission, promote labor organizations and the union movement. New religions draw on both traditional beliefs and on Christianity, achieving a baffling variety and diversity of views. It has been estimated that there were as many as 5000 new religions in South Korea in the late 19th century, though many were small and transient phenomena.
 
Given the great diversity of religious expression, the role of religion in South Korea's social development has been complex. Some traditions are adhered to as important cultural properties rather than as rites of worship. Confucianism remains important as a social ethic; its influence is evident in the immense importance Koreans ascribe to education. Christianity is identified with modernization and social reform. Many Christians in contemporary South Korea, such as veteran political opposition leader [[Kim Dae-jung]], a Catholic, have been outspoken advocates of human rights and critics of the government. Christian-sponsored organizations, such as the Urban Industrial Mission, promote labor organizations and the union movement. New religions draw on both traditional beliefs and on Christianity, achieving a baffling variety and diversity of views. It has been estimated that there were as many as 5000 new religions in South Korea in the late 19th century, though many were small and transient phenomena.
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