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ID:108186
User:173.9.121.145
Article:Gargoyle
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(Undid revision 401008002 by 12.204.194.160 (talk) revert good faith edit that might be better done and returned.)
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[[Image:Gargoyle, Dornoch Cathedral.jpg|thumb|right|220px|A gargoyle adorning [[Dornoch Cathedral]] in [[Dornoch]], [[Scotland]]]]
 
[[Image:Gargoyle, Dornoch Cathedral.jpg|thumb|right|220px|A gargoyle adorning [[Dornoch Cathedral]] in [[Dornoch]], [[Scotland]]]]
 
[[Image:Gargoyle Wawel Cathedral 01 AB.jpg|thumb|right|220px|Gargoyle of Waza Chapel, [[Wawel Cathedral]]]]
 
[[Image:Gargoyle Wawel Cathedral 01 AB.jpg|thumb|right|220px|Gargoyle of Waza Chapel, [[Wawel Cathedral]]]]
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Hello everyone,
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From Eric
   
 
In [[architecture]], a '''gargoyle''' is a carved stone [[grotesque]] with a spout designed to convey water from a roof and away from the side of a building. Preventing rainwater from running down [[masonry]] walls is important because running water erodes the [[Mortar (masonry)|mortar]] between the stone blocks.<ref>{{cite book|author=Janetta Rebold Benton|authorlink=|title=Holy Terrors: Gargoyles on Medieval Buildings|edition=|publisher=Abbeville Press|year=1997|location=New York|pages=6–8|url=|isbn=0-7892-0182-8}}</ref> Architects often used multiple gargoyles on buildings to divide the flow of rainwater off the roof to minimize the potential damage from a rainstorm. A trough is cut in the back of the gargoyle and rainwater typically exits through the open mouth. Gargoyles are usually an elongated fantastic animal because the length of the gargoyle determines how far water is thrown from the wall. When Gothic [[flying buttress]]es were used, [[aqueduct]]s were sometimes cut into the buttress to divert water over the aisle walls.
 
In [[architecture]], a '''gargoyle''' is a carved stone [[grotesque]] with a spout designed to convey water from a roof and away from the side of a building. Preventing rainwater from running down [[masonry]] walls is important because running water erodes the [[Mortar (masonry)|mortar]] between the stone blocks.<ref>{{cite book|author=Janetta Rebold Benton|authorlink=|title=Holy Terrors: Gargoyles on Medieval Buildings|edition=|publisher=Abbeville Press|year=1997|location=New York|pages=6–8|url=|isbn=0-7892-0182-8}}</ref> Architects often used multiple gargoyles on buildings to divide the flow of rainwater off the roof to minimize the potential damage from a rainstorm. A trough is cut in the back of the gargoyle and rainwater typically exits through the open mouth. Gargoyles are usually an elongated fantastic animal because the length of the gargoyle determines how far water is thrown from the wall. When Gothic [[flying buttress]]es were used, [[aqueduct]]s were sometimes cut into the buttress to divert water over the aisle walls.
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