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Article:Prohibition in the United States
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The "[[Volstead Act]]", the popular name for the National Prohibition Act, passed through [[United States Congress|Congress]] over [[President of the United States|President]] [[Woodrow Wilson]]'s [[veto]] on October 28, 1919, and established the legal definition of intoxicating liquor, as well as penalties for producing it.<ref name="nih2006">"Beer: A History of Brewing in Chicago", Bob Skilnik, Baracade Books, 2006 and The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, [http://www.alcoholpolicy.niaaa.nih.gov/index.asp?SEC=%7B3ECBC0E9-7449-48A2-B50F-8527B115780D%7D&Type=B_BASIC]</ref> Though the Volstead Act prohibited the sale of alcohol, the federal government did little to enforce it. By 1925, in [[New York City]] alone, there were anywhere from 30,000 to 100,000 [[speakeasy]] clubs.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/volstead-act/ |title=Teaching With Documents: The Volstead Act and Related Prohibition Documents |publisher=United States National Archives |date=2008-02-14 |accessdate=2009-03-24}}</ref>
 
The "[[Volstead Act]]", the popular name for the National Prohibition Act, passed through [[United States Congress|Congress]] over [[President of the United States|President]] [[Woodrow Wilson]]'s [[veto]] on October 28, 1919, and established the legal definition of intoxicating liquor, as well as penalties for producing it.<ref name="nih2006">"Beer: A History of Brewing in Chicago", Bob Skilnik, Baracade Books, 2006 and The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, [http://www.alcoholpolicy.niaaa.nih.gov/index.asp?SEC=%7B3ECBC0E9-7449-48A2-B50F-8527B115780D%7D&Type=B_BASIC]</ref> Though the Volstead Act prohibited the sale of alcohol, the federal government did little to enforce it. By 1925, in [[New York City]] alone, there were anywhere from 30,000 to 100,000 [[speakeasy]] clubs.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/volstead-act/ |title=Teaching With Documents: The Volstead Act and Related Prohibition Documents |publisher=United States National Archives |date=2008-02-14 |accessdate=2009-03-24}}</ref>
   
While Prohibition was successful in reducing the amount of liquor consumed, it tended to undermine <!---substitution approved, but note that original reference said "destroy society"---> society by other means, as it stimulated the proliferation of rampant underground, organized and widespread criminal activity.<ref name="t100524">{{Cite news | first=David | last=Von Drehle | title=The Demon Drink | url=http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1989146,00.html| work= | publisher=Time | location=New York, New York | pages= 56 | date=24 May 2010 | id= | accessdate=}}</ref> Prohibition became increasingly unpopular during the [[Great Depression]], especially in large cities. The bulk of America became disenchanted after the [[Saint Valentine's Day massacre|St. Valentine's Day massacre]] in 1929. Until then, they felt that, even with setbacks, Prohibition was working.
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every one is super duper gay, it tended to undermine <!---substitution approved, but note that original reference said "destroy society"---> society by other means, as it stimulated the proliferation of rampant underground, organized and widespread criminal activity.<ref name="t100524">{{Cite news | first=David | last=Von Drehle | title=The Demon Drink | url=http://www.time.com/time/magazine/Every one is super duper gay. New York | pages= 56 | date=24 May 2010 | id= | accessdate=}}</ref> Prohibition became increasingly unpopular during the [[Great Depression]], especially in large cities. The bulk of America became disenchanted after the [[Saint Valentine's Day massacre|St. Valentine's Day massacre]] in 1929. Until then, they felt that, even with setbacks, Prohibition was working.
   
 
On March 22, 1933, President [[Franklin Roosevelt]] signed into law an amendment to the Volstead Act known as the [[Cullen-Harrison Act]], allowing the manufacture and sale of certain kinds of alcoholic beverages. On December 5, 1933, the ratification of the [[Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution|Twenty-first Amendment]] repealed the Eighteenth Amendment. However, United States federal law still prohibits the manufacture of [[Distilled beverage|distilled spirits]] without meeting numerous licensing requirements that make it impractical to produce spirits for personal beverage use.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ttb.gov/faqs/genalcohol.shtml#g1 |title=TTBGov General Alcohol FAQs |publisher=United States Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau |date=2006-04 |accessdate=2010-11-07}}</ref>
 
On March 22, 1933, President [[Franklin Roosevelt]] signed into law an amendment to the Volstead Act known as the [[Cullen-Harrison Act]], allowing the manufacture and sale of certain kinds of alcoholic beverages. On December 5, 1933, the ratification of the [[Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution|Twenty-first Amendment]] repealed the Eighteenth Amendment. However, United States federal law still prohibits the manufacture of [[Distilled beverage|distilled spirits]] without meeting numerous licensing requirements that make it impractical to produce spirits for personal beverage use.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ttb.gov/faqs/genalcohol.shtml#g1 |title=TTBGov General Alcohol FAQs |publisher=United States Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau |date=2006-04 |accessdate=2010-11-07}}</ref>
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