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ID:1128306
User:195.195.5.19
Article:Flannan Isles
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As the name implies, Eilean Taighe hosts a ruined stone shelter. Eilean Mòr is home to the lighthouse and a ruined [[chapel]] dedicated to St Flannan, which the lighthouse keepers referred to as the "dog kennel" because of its small size. These ruined [[bothies]] were collectively described by the ''Ancient Monuments Commission'' as The Bothies of the [[Chattan Confederation|Clan McPhail]]<ref name=NLB1>[http://www.nlb.org.uk/ourlights/history/flannan.htm "Flannan Isles Lighthouse "] Northern Lighthouse Board. Retrieved 23 March 2008.</ref> or Bothain Chlann ‘ic Phaill.<ref name=Tait>[http://www.innsegall.co.uk/guide/outliers/out_flannan.htm "Western Isles Guide Book: Flannan Islands]. Charles Tait photographic Ltd. Retrieved 23 March 2008.</ref> It is not entirely clear which St. Flannan the chapel honours. It is likely that he was either the 7th century Abbot of [[Killaloe, County Clare|Killaloe]] in [[County Clare]] or alternatively the half brother of the 8th century [[St Ronan]] who gave his name to the nearby island of [[North Rona]]. There was also a certain Flann, son of an Abbot of [[Iona]] called Maol-duine who died in 890, and who may have loaned his name to these isolated isles.<ref name=Smith/>
 
As the name implies, Eilean Taighe hosts a ruined stone shelter. Eilean Mòr is home to the lighthouse and a ruined [[chapel]] dedicated to St Flannan, which the lighthouse keepers referred to as the "dog kennel" because of its small size. These ruined [[bothies]] were collectively described by the ''Ancient Monuments Commission'' as The Bothies of the [[Chattan Confederation|Clan McPhail]]<ref name=NLB1>[http://www.nlb.org.uk/ourlights/history/flannan.htm "Flannan Isles Lighthouse "] Northern Lighthouse Board. Retrieved 23 March 2008.</ref> or Bothain Chlann ‘ic Phaill.<ref name=Tait>[http://www.innsegall.co.uk/guide/outliers/out_flannan.htm "Western Isles Guide Book: Flannan Islands]. Charles Tait photographic Ltd. Retrieved 23 March 2008.</ref> It is not entirely clear which St. Flannan the chapel honours. It is likely that he was either the 7th century Abbot of [[Killaloe, County Clare|Killaloe]] in [[County Clare]] or alternatively the half brother of the 8th century [[St Ronan]] who gave his name to the nearby island of [[North Rona]]. There was also a certain Flann, son of an Abbot of [[Iona]] called Maol-duine who died in 890, and who may have loaned his name to these isolated isles.<ref name=Smith/>
   
The [[archipelago]] is also known as 'The Seven Hunters', and in the [[Middle Ages]] they may also have been called the 'Seven Haley (Holy) Isles'.<ref>Munro, Sir Donald (1594) ''Description of the Western Isles of Scotland''.</ref> [[Martin Martin]] (1703) lists a number of unusual customs associated with regular pilgrimages to Eilean Mòr such as removing one's hat and making a [[sunwise]] turn when reaching the plateau.<ref>Martin (1703) pp. 97&ndash;98.</ref> It is possible that the saint or his acolytes lived on Eilean Mòr and perhaps Eilean Taighe as well. However, it is unlikely that there were permanent residents on the islands once the [[Celtic Church]] fell into decline in the [[Hebrides]] (as a result of 9th century [[Viking]] invasions), until the construction of the lighthouse and its occupation very shortly before the dawn of the 20th century.
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The [[archipelago]] is also known as 'The Seven Hunters', and in the [[Middle Ages]] they may also have been called the 'Seven Haley (Holy) Isles'.<ref>Munro, Sir Donald (1594) ''Description of the Western Isles of Scotland''.</ref> [[Martin Martin]] (1703) lists a number of unusual customs associated with regular pilgrimages to Eilean Mòr such as removing one's hat and making a [[sunwise]] turn when reaching the plateau.<ref>Martin (1703) pp. 97&ndash;98.</ref> It is possible that the saint or his acolytes lived on Eilean Mòr and perhaps Eilean Taighe as well. However, it is unlikely that there were permanent residents on the islands once the [[Celtic Church]] fell into decline in the [[Hebrides]] (as a result of 9th century [[Viking]] invasions), until the construction of the lighthouse and its occupation very shortly before the dawn of the 20th century. The mens bodies where no where to be found!.
   
 
[[File:Morus-bassanus Northern Gannet.jpg|thumb|right|Northern Gannet (''Morus bassanus'') in flight.]]
 
[[File:Morus-bassanus Northern Gannet.jpg|thumb|right|Northern Gannet (''Morus bassanus'') in flight.]]
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A boat was launched and Joseph Moore, the relief keeper, was put ashore alone. He found the entrance gate to the compound and main door both closed, the beds unmade and the clock stopped. Returning to the landing stage with this grim news, he then went back up to the lighthouse with the ''Hesperus's'' second-mate and a seaman. A further search revealed that the lamps were cleaned and refilled. A set of [[oilskin]]s was found, suggesting that one of the keepers had left the lighthouse without them, which was surprising considering the severity of the weather. The only sign of anything amiss in the lighthouse was an overturned chair by the kitchen table. Of the keepers there was no sign, either inside the lighthouse or anywhere on the island.<ref name=lhm>[http://www.lighthousemuseum.org.uk/history/FlannanIslesdocuments.htm "Transcripts from documents related to the Flannan Isles mystery.] Museum of Scottish Lighthouses. Retrieved 3 September 2008.</ref>
 
A boat was launched and Joseph Moore, the relief keeper, was put ashore alone. He found the entrance gate to the compound and main door both closed, the beds unmade and the clock stopped. Returning to the landing stage with this grim news, he then went back up to the lighthouse with the ''Hesperus's'' second-mate and a seaman. A further search revealed that the lamps were cleaned and refilled. A set of [[oilskin]]s was found, suggesting that one of the keepers had left the lighthouse without them, which was surprising considering the severity of the weather. The only sign of anything amiss in the lighthouse was an overturned chair by the kitchen table. Of the keepers there was no sign, either inside the lighthouse or anywhere on the island.<ref name=lhm>[http://www.lighthousemuseum.org.uk/history/FlannanIslesdocuments.htm "Transcripts from documents related to the Flannan Isles mystery.] Museum of Scottish Lighthouses. Retrieved 3 September 2008.</ref>
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If you know anything please let the police know.
   
 
Moore and three volunteer seamen were left to attend the light and the ''Hesperus'' returned to the shore station at [[Breasclete]]. Captain Harvie sent a telegram to the [[Northern Lighthouse Board]] dated 26 December 1900, stating:
 
Moore and three volunteer seamen were left to attend the light and the ''Hesperus'' returned to the shore station at [[Breasclete]]. Captain Harvie sent a telegram to the [[Northern Lighthouse Board]] dated 26 December 1900, stating:
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