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ID:1245135
User:208.108.81.133
Article:War
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(fixed)
(Etymology)
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[[File:Gari-Melchers-War-Highsmith.jpeg|thumb|right|350px|Mural of War (1896), by [[Gari Melchers]].]]
 
[[File:Gari-Melchers-War-Highsmith.jpeg|thumb|right|350px|Mural of War (1896), by [[Gari Melchers]].]]
 
The English word ''war'' derives from the late [[Old English]] (c.1050) words ''wyrre'' and ''werre''; the [[Old French|Old North French]] ''werre''; the [[Franks|Frankish]] ''werra''; and the [[Proto-Germanic language|Proto-Germanic]] ''werso''. The denotation of ''war'' derives from the [[Old Saxon]] ''werran'', [[Old High German]] ''werran'', and the German ''verwirren'': “to confuse”, “to perplex”, and “to bring into confusion”.<ref>{{cite web |title=war |publisher=Online Etymology Dictionary |url=http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=war |year=2010 |accessdate=24 April 2011}}</ref> Another posited derivation is from the [[Ancient Greek]] ''barbaros'', the [[Old Persian]] ''varhara'', and the Sanskrit ''varvar'' and ''barbara''. In German, the equivalent is ''Krieg''; the equivalent Spanish, [[Portuguese language|Portuguese]], and Italian words for "war" is ''guerra'', derived from the Germanic ''werra'' (“fight”, “tumult”).<ref>''Diccionario de la Lengua Española'', 21<sup>a</sup> edición (1992) p. 1071</ref> Etymologic legend has it that the Romanic peoples adopted a foreign, Germanic word for "war", to avoid using the [[Latin]] ''bellum'', because, when sounded, it tended to merge with the sound of the word ''bello'' ("beautiful")
 
The English word ''war'' derives from the late [[Old English]] (c.1050) words ''wyrre'' and ''werre''; the [[Old French|Old North French]] ''werre''; the [[Franks|Frankish]] ''werra''; and the [[Proto-Germanic language|Proto-Germanic]] ''werso''. The denotation of ''war'' derives from the [[Old Saxon]] ''werran'', [[Old High German]] ''werran'', and the German ''verwirren'': “to confuse”, “to perplex”, and “to bring into confusion”.<ref>{{cite web |title=war |publisher=Online Etymology Dictionary |url=http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=war |year=2010 |accessdate=24 April 2011}}</ref> Another posited derivation is from the [[Ancient Greek]] ''barbaros'', the [[Old Persian]] ''varhara'', and the Sanskrit ''varvar'' and ''barbara''. In German, the equivalent is ''Krieg''; the equivalent Spanish, [[Portuguese language|Portuguese]], and Italian words for "war" is ''guerra'', derived from the Germanic ''werra'' (“fight”, “tumult”).<ref>''Diccionario de la Lengua Española'', 21<sup>a</sup> edición (1992) p. 1071</ref> Etymologic legend has it that the Romanic peoples adopted a foreign, Germanic word for "war", to avoid using the [[Latin]] ''bellum'', because, when sounded, it tended to merge with the sound of the word ''bello'' ("beautiful")
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and then he said ur so sexy
   
 
==History of warfare==
 
==History of warfare==
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