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ID:1253809
User:208.108.81.133
Article:Great Chicago Fire
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==Origin==
 
==Origin==
 
[[File:Great Chicago Fire map.jpg|right|thumb|200px|1868 map of Chicago, modified (2009) to highlight the area destroyed by the fire.]]
 
[[File:Great Chicago Fire map.jpg|right|thumb|200px|1868 map of Chicago, modified (2009) to highlight the area destroyed by the fire.]]
The fire started at about 9 p.m. on Sunday, October 8, in or around a small barn that bordered the alley behind 137 [[DeKoven Street (Chicago)|DeKoven Street]].<ref>{{cite book | last = Pierce | first = Bessie Louise | authorlink = Bessie Louise Pierce | title = A History of Chicago: Volume III: The Rise of a Modern City, 1871–1893 | publisher = University of Chicago Press | date = 1957, rep. 2007 | location = Chicago | pages = 4 | isbn = 978-0-226-66842-0}}</ref> The traditional account of the origin of the fire is that it was started by a cow kicking over a lantern in the barn owned by Patrick and [[Catherine O'Leary]]. In 1893, Michael Ahern, the ''Chicago Republican'' reporter who wrote the O'Leary account, admitted he had made it up as colorful copy.<ref>{{cite web | title = The O'Leary Legend | publisher = Chicago History Museum | url = http://www.chicagohistory.org/fire/oleary/essay-2.html | accessdate = 2007-03-18}}</ref> The barn was the first building to be consumed by the fire, but the official report could not determine the exact cause of it.<ref name = "owen">L.L. Owens, ''The Great Chicago Fire'', ABDO, p. 7.</ref>
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The fire started at about 9 p.m. on Sunday, October 8, in or around a small barn that bordered the alley behind 137 [[DeKoven Street (Chicago)|DeKoven Street]].<ref>{{cite book | last = Pierce | first = Bessie Louise | authorlink = Bessie Louise Pierce | title = A History of Chicago: Volume III: The Rise of a Modern City, 1871–1893 | publisher = University of Chicago Press | date = 1957, rep. 2007 | location = Chicago | pages = 4 | isbn = 978-0-226-66842-0}}</ref> The traditional account of the origin of the fire is that it was started by a cow kicking over a lantern in the barn owned by Patrick and [[Catherine O'Leary]]. In 1893, Michael Ahern, the ''Chicago Republican'' reporter who wrote the O'Leary account, admitted he had made it up as colorful copy.<ref>{{cite web | title = The O'Leary Legend | publisher = Chicago History Museum | url = http://www.chicagohistory.org/fire/oleary/essay-2.html | accessdate = 2007-03-18}}</ref> The barn was the first building to be consumed by the fire, but the official report could not determine the exact cause of it.<ref name = "owen">L.L. Owens, ''The Great Chicago Fire'', ABDO, p. 7.</ref> YOLOOO
   
 
The fire's spread was aided by the city's overuse of wood for building, a drought prior to the fire, and strong winds from the southwest that carried flying embers toward the heart of the city. The city did not react quickly enough, and at first, residents were not concerned about it, not realizing the high risk of conditions. The firefighters were tired from having fought a fire the day before.<ref>{{Cite news | title = The fire Fiend | newspaper = Chicago Daily Tribune | pages = 3 | date = 1871-10-08 | accessdate = 2007-11-27}}</ref>
 
The fire's spread was aided by the city's overuse of wood for building, a drought prior to the fire, and strong winds from the southwest that carried flying embers toward the heart of the city. The city did not react quickly enough, and at first, residents were not concerned about it, not realizing the high risk of conditions. The firefighters were tired from having fought a fire the day before.<ref>{{Cite news | title = The fire Fiend | newspaper = Chicago Daily Tribune | pages = 3 | date = 1871-10-08 | accessdate = 2007-11-27}}</ref>
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