ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Report

Navigation

ID:1295500
User:61.245.172.35
Article:Rotary vane pump
Diff:
Line 6: Line 6:
 
A '''rotary vane pump''' is a p that consists of vanes mounted to a [[Rotor (turbine)|rotor]] that rotates inside of a cavity. In some cases these vanes can be variable length and/or tensioned to maintain contact with the walls as the pump rotates. It was invented by Charles C. Barnes of [[Sackville, New Brunswick]] who patented it on June 16, 1874.<ref>Mario Theriault, ''Great Maritme Inventions 1833-1950'', Goose Lane Editions, 2001, p. 53</ref>
 
A '''rotary vane pump''' is a p that consists of vanes mounted to a [[Rotor (turbine)|rotor]] that rotates inside of a cavity. In some cases these vanes can be variable length and/or tensioned to maintain contact with the walls as the pump rotates. It was invented by Charles C. Barnes of [[Sackville, New Brunswick]] who patented it on June 16, 1874.<ref>Mario Theriault, ''Great Maritme Inventions 1833-1950'', Goose Lane Editions, 2001, p. 53</ref>
   
==Types==
+
==Types== types nam godak tiyanawa
 
The simplest vane pump is a circular rotor rotating inside of a larger circular cavity. The centers of these two circles are offset, causing eccentricity. Vanes are allowed to slide into and out of the rotor and seal on all edges, creating vane chambers that do the pumping work. On the intake side of the pump, the vane chambers are increasing in volume. These increasing volume vane chambers are filled with fluid forced in by the inlet pressure. Inlet pressure is actually the pressure from the system being pumped, often just the atmosphere. On the discharge side of the pump, the vane chambers are decreasing in volume, forcing fluid out of the pump. The action of the vane drives out the same volume of fluid with each rotation. Multistage rotary vane vacuum pumps can attain pressures as low as 10<sup>−3</sup> [[Bar (unit)|mbar]] (0.1 [[Pascal (unit)|Pa]]).
 
The simplest vane pump is a circular rotor rotating inside of a larger circular cavity. The centers of these two circles are offset, causing eccentricity. Vanes are allowed to slide into and out of the rotor and seal on all edges, creating vane chambers that do the pumping work. On the intake side of the pump, the vane chambers are increasing in volume. These increasing volume vane chambers are filled with fluid forced in by the inlet pressure. Inlet pressure is actually the pressure from the system being pumped, often just the atmosphere. On the discharge side of the pump, the vane chambers are decreasing in volume, forcing fluid out of the pump. The action of the vane drives out the same volume of fluid with each rotation. Multistage rotary vane vacuum pumps can attain pressures as low as 10<sup>−3</sup> [[Bar (unit)|mbar]] (0.1 [[Pascal (unit)|Pa]]).
   
Reason:ANN scored at 0.898006
Your username:
Reverted:Yes
Comment
(optional):

Note: Comments are completely optional. You do not have to justify your edit.
If this is a false positive, then you're right, and the bot is wrong - you don't need to explain why.