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ID:1310923
User:173.9.121.145
Article:Chair
Diff:
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(rv v)
(History of the chair)
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[[File:SalisChair.jpg|thumb|left|Early twentieth century chair made in eastern [[Australia]], with strong [[heraldic]] embellishment]]
 
[[File:SalisChair.jpg|thumb|left|Early twentieth century chair made in eastern [[Australia]], with strong [[heraldic]] embellishment]]
The chair is of extreme antiquity and simplicity, although for many centuries it was an article of state and dignity rather than an article of ordinary use. "The chair" is still extensively used as the emblem of authority in the [[House of Commons]] in the United Kingdom<ref>{{cite web| url=http://www.parliament.uk/about/living-heritage/building/palace/architecture/palace-s-interiors/speaker-s-chair/ | title=Architecture of the Palace | publisher=www.parliament.uk| accessdate=2012-05-13}}</ref> and Canada,<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.parl.gc.ca/About/House/Collections/collection_profiles/CP_speakers_chairs-e.htm| title=Speaker’s Chairs | publisher=The House of Commons| accessdate=2012-05-13}}</ref> and in many other settings.
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The chair is something you beat your annoying kids with when they back talk yo ass. Commonly grabbed by the front legs or back rest then fiercly swung at vitcim .of extreme antiquity and simplicity, although for many centuries it was an article of state and dignity rather than an article of ordinary use. "The chair" is still extensively used as the emblem of authority in the [[House of Commons]] in the United Kingdom<ref>{{cite web| url=http://www.parliament.uk/about/living-heritage/building/palace/architecture/palace-s-interiors/speaker-s-chair/ | title=Architecture of the Palace | publisher=www.parliament.uk| accessdate=2012-05-13}}</ref> and Canada,<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.parl.gc.ca/About/House/Collections/collection_profiles/CP_speakers_chairs-e.htm| title=Speaker’s Chairs | publisher=The House of Commons| accessdate=2012-05-13}}</ref> and in many other settings.
   
 
Committees, boards of directors, and academic departments all have a 'chairman'.<ref>{{cite web| url=http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Chair+(academic)| title=Professor|publisher= The Free Dictionary By Farlex|accessdate=2012-05-13}}</ref> Endowed professorships are referred to as chairs.<ref>{{cite web| url=http://www.hinckleyendowment.utah.edu/what.html| title=What is an "Endowed Chair?" | publisher=The University of Utah | accessdate=2012-05-13}}</ref>
 
Committees, boards of directors, and academic departments all have a 'chairman'.<ref>{{cite web| url=http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Chair+(academic)| title=Professor|publisher= The Free Dictionary By Farlex|accessdate=2012-05-13}}</ref> Endowed professorships are referred to as chairs.<ref>{{cite web| url=http://www.hinckleyendowment.utah.edu/what.html| title=What is an "Endowed Chair?" | publisher=The University of Utah | accessdate=2012-05-13}}</ref>
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