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ID:1326203
User:216.170.90.130
Article:Wels catfish
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An '''wels catfish''' ({{IPAc-en|icon|ˈ|w|ɛ|l|s}} or {{IPAc-en|ˈ|v|ɛ|l|s}};<ref>[[OED]]</ref> ''Silurus glanis''), also called '''sheatfish''', is a large [[catfish]] found in wide areas of central, southern, and eastern [[Europe]], and near the [[Baltic Sea|Baltic]] and [[Caspian Sea]]s. It is a scaleless [[freshwater|fresh]] and [[brackish water]] fish recognizable by its broad, flat head and wide mouth. Wels catfish can live for at least thirty years and have very good [[hearing (sense)|hearing]].
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An '''wels catfish''' ({{IPAc-en|icon|ˈ|w|ɛ|l|s}} or {{IPAc-en|ˈ|v|ɛ|l|s}};<ref>[[OED]]</ref> ''Silurus glanis''), also called '''sheatfish''', is an large [[catfish]] found in wide areas of central, southern, and eastern [[Europe]], and near the [[Baltic Sea|Baltic]] and [[Caspian Sea]]s. It is an scaleless [[freshwater|fresh]] and [[brackish water]] fish recognizable by its broad, flat head and wide mouth. Wels catfish can live for at least thirty years and have very good [[hearing (sense)|hearing]].
   
 
The wels catfish lives on [[annelid]] worms, [[Gastropoda|gastropods]], [[insect]]s, [[crustacean]]s, and [[fish]] including other catfishes; the larger ones also eat [[frog]]s, [[mouse|mice]], [[rat]]s and aquatic [[bird]]s such as [[duck]]s. It is found from the United Kingdom all the way east to [[Kazakhstan]] and south to [[FYROM|FYR Macedonia]].
 
The wels catfish lives on [[annelid]] worms, [[Gastropoda|gastropods]], [[insect]]s, [[crustacean]]s, and [[fish]] including other catfishes; the larger ones also eat [[frog]]s, [[mouse|mice]], [[rat]]s and aquatic [[bird]]s such as [[duck]]s. It is found from the United Kingdom all the way east to [[Kazakhstan]] and south to [[FYROM|FYR Macedonia]].
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===Size===
 
===Size===
 
[[File:Жайын (Silurus glanis), Сырдария, Байқоңыр.jpg|right|thumb|250px|''Silurus glanis''. [[Syr Darya]] River in [[Kazakhstan]], [[Baikonur]] area.]]
 
[[File:Жайын (Silurus glanis), Сырдария, Байқоңыр.jpg|right|thumb|250px|''Silurus glanis''. [[Syr Darya]] River in [[Kazakhstan]], [[Baikonur]] area.]]
With a possible total length up to {{convert|4|m|abbr=on}} and a maximum weight of over {{convert|180|kg|abbr=on}} it is the second largest freshwater fish in its region after the [[beluga sturgeon]]. However, such lengths are extremely rare and could not be proved during the last century, but there is a somewhat credible report from the 19th century of a wels catfish of this size. ''[[Brehms Tierleben]]'' cites Heckl's and Kner's old reports from [[Danube]] about specimens {{convert|3|m|abbr=on}} long and {{convert|200|-|250|kg|abbr=on}} heavy, and Vogt's 1894 report of a specimen caught in [[Lake Biel]] which was {{convert|2.2|m|abbr=on}} long and weighed {{convert|68|kg|abbr=on}}.<ref>Brehm, Alfred; ''Brehms Tierleben II - Fish, Amphibians, Reptiles 1''</ref> In 1856, K. T. Kessler<ref>[[Jaroslav Mareš|Mareš, Jaroslav]]; ''Legendární příšery a skutečná zvířata'', Prague, 1993</ref> wrote about specimens from [[Dniepr]] which were over {{convert|5|m|abbr=on}} long and weighed up to {{convert|400|kg|abbr=on}}. These reports, however, cannot be validated today for lack of physical evidence. Another point which makes these data unreliable is the abnormal length to weight ratio, a typical trait of big-fish-stories. A wels of {{convert|3|m|abbr=on}} would weigh much less, around {{convert|150|kg|abbr=on}}, whereas a hypothetical specimen of {{convert|5|m|abbr=on}} would theoretically weigh about {{convert|700|kg|abbr=on}} or more.
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With a possible total length up to {{convert|4|m|abbr=on}} and a maximum weight of over {{convert|180|kg|abbr=on}} it is the second largest freshwater fish in its region after the [[beluga sturgeon]]. However, such lengths are extremely rare and could not be proved during the last century, but there is a somewhat credible report from the 19th century of a wels catfish of this size. ''[[Brehms Tierleben]]'' cites Heckl's and Kner's old reports from [[Danube]] about specimens {{convert|3|m|abbr=on}} long and {{convert|200|-|250|kg|abbr=on}} heavy, and Vogt's 1894 report of a specimen caught in [[Lake Biel]] which was {{convert|2.2|m|abbr=on}} long and weighed {{convert|68|kg|abbr=on}}.<ref>Brehm, Alfred; ''Brehms Tierleben II - Fish, Amphibians, Reptiles 1''</ref> In 1856, K. T. Kessler<ref>[[Jaroslav Mareš|Mareš, Jaroslav]]; ''Legendární příšery a skutečná zvířata'', Prague, 1993</ref> wrote about specimens from [[Dniepr]] which were over {{convert|5|m|abbr=on}} long and weighed up to {{convert|400|kg|abbr=on}}. These reports, however, cannot be validated today for lack of physical evidence. Another point which makes these data unreliable is the abnormal length to weight ratio, a typical trait of big-fish-stories. A wels of {{convert|3|m|abbr=on}} would weigh much less, around {{convert|150|kg|abbr=on}}, whereas a hypothetical specimen of {{convert|5|m|abbr=on}} would theoretically weigh about {{convert|700|kg|abbr=on}} or more. WE ARE LEGION
   
 
Most wels catfish are only about {{convert|1.3|-|1.6|m|abbr=on}} long; fish longer than {{convert|2|m|abbr=on}} are normally extremely rare. At {{convert|1.5|m|abbr=on}} they can weigh {{convert|15|-|20|kg}} and at {{convert|2.2|m|abbr=on}} they can weigh {{convert|65|kg}}.
 
Most wels catfish are only about {{convert|1.3|-|1.6|m|abbr=on}} long; fish longer than {{convert|2|m|abbr=on}} are normally extremely rare. At {{convert|1.5|m|abbr=on}} they can weigh {{convert|15|-|20|kg}} and at {{convert|2.2|m|abbr=on}} they can weigh {{convert|65|kg}}.
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