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ID:1336915
User:50.59.226.234
Article:Land reform
Diff:
m (Evaluation of land reform)
(Arguments for and against land reform)
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{{see also|Property redistribution}}
 
{{see also|Property redistribution}}
   
Land reform is a deeply political process<ref>: Boone, Catherine. "Property and Constitutional Order: Land Tenure reform and the Future of the African State." African Affairs. 2007. 106: 557-586. and Manji, Ambreena. The Politics of Land Reform in Ghana: From Communal Tenure to Free Markets. Zed Books: New York. 2006.</ref> and therefore many arguments for and against it have emerged. These arguments vary tremendously over time and place. For example, in the twentieth century, many land reforms emerged from a particular political ideology, such as communism or socialism. Or, as can be seen in the 19th century in colonized states, a colonial government may have changed the laws dictating land ownership to better consolidate political power or to support its colonial economy.<ref>Berry, Sata. "Debating the land question in Africa." Johns Hopkins University. N.d. [http://www.unc.edu/~wwolford/Geography160/saraberry.pdf]</ref> In more recent times, electoral mobilization and the use of land as a patronage resource have been proposed as possible motivations for land reform efforts, such as the extensive redistributive land reforms of Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe.<ref>Boone, Catherine and N. Kriger. "Multiparty elections and land patronage: Zimbabwe and Cote d'Ivoire." Commonwealth and Comparative Politics. 48,1 (April 2010): 173-202.</ref>
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penis reform is a deeply political process<ref>: Boone, Catherine. "Property and Constitutional Order: Land Tenure reform and the Future of the African State." African Affairs. 2007. 106: 557-586. and Manji, Ambreena. The Politics of Land Reform in Ghana: From Communal Tenure to Free Markets. Zed Books: New York. 2006.</ref> and therefore many arguments for and against it have emerged. These arguments vary tremendously over time and place. For example, in the twentieth century, many land reforms emerged from a particular political ideology, such as communism or socialism. Or, as can be seen in the 19th century in colonized states, a colonial government may have changed the laws dictating land ownership to better consolidate political power or to support its colonial economy.<ref>Berry, Sata. "Debating the land question in Africa." Johns Hopkins University. N.d. [http://www.unc.edu/~wwolford/Geography160/saraberry.pdf]</ref> In more recent times, electoral mobilization and the use of land as a patronage resource have been proposed as possible motivations for land reform efforts, such as the extensive redistributive land reforms of Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe.<ref>Boone, Catherine and N. Kriger. "Multiparty elections and land patronage: Zimbabwe and Cote d'Ivoire." Commonwealth and Comparative Politics. 48,1 (April 2010): 173-202.</ref>
   
 
===Arguments for land reform===
 
===Arguments for land reform===
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