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ID:134193
User:74.101.104.191
Article:Ryne Duren
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The Athletics and [[New York Yankees|Yankees]] were frequent trading partners in that era, and on June 15, {{By|1957}} Duren, Pisoni, and [[Harry Simpson]] were sent to the Yankees for [[Billy Martin]], [[Ralph Terry]], [[Woodie Held]], and [[Bob Martyn]]. Duren kept his A's uniform number of 26 with the Yankees. Duren received the first of his three [[Major League Baseball All-Star Game|All-Star]] selections [[the following year|{{By|1957}}]]. He has been retroactively credited with saving 20 games in 1958, the high mark in the [[American League]] that year. In 1959, his won-lost record was much poorer, but his [[earned run average]] of 1.88 was the best of his career.
 
The Athletics and [[New York Yankees|Yankees]] were frequent trading partners in that era, and on June 15, {{By|1957}} Duren, Pisoni, and [[Harry Simpson]] were sent to the Yankees for [[Billy Martin]], [[Ralph Terry]], [[Woodie Held]], and [[Bob Martyn]]. Duren kept his A's uniform number of 26 with the Yankees. Duren received the first of his three [[Major League Baseball All-Star Game|All-Star]] selections [[the following year|{{By|1957}}]]. He has been retroactively credited with saving 20 games in 1958, the high mark in the [[American League]] that year. In 1959, his won-lost record was much poorer, but his [[earned run average]] of 1.88 was the best of his career.
   
Duren was a showman. In those days the Yankee bullpen was a part of the short-porch right field and only a low chain link fence served as the boundary. When called upon by Casey Stengel to relieve, he wouldn’t use the gate, but preferred to hop the fence with one hand and begin a slow walk to the mound with his blue Yankee warm-up jacket covering his pitching arm; he followed this routine even on the hottest days. When he finally took the ball and began his warmups, the first pitch was typically a hard fastball 20 feet over the catcher’s head. The succeeding warmup pitches would be thrown lower and lower (but not slower) until Duren would finally "find" the plate.
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1960 World Series game 7: why didn't Casey Stengel use Duren? Was Duren fit to pitch? If not, was Duren's alcoholism the reason? On the recent broadcast on MLB network announcer Mel Allen does not mention Duren, nor is Duren shown warming up.
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Duren was a showman. In those days the Yankee bullpen was a part of the short-porch right field and only a low chain link fence served as the boundary. When called upon by Casey Stengel to relieve, he wouldn’t use the gate, but preferred to hop the fence with one hand and begin a slow walk to the mound with his blue Yankee warm-up jacket covering his pitching arm; he followed this routine even on the hottest days. When he finally took the ball and began his warmups, the first pitch was typically a hard fastball 20 feet over the catcher’s head. The succeeding warmup pitches would be thrown lower and lower (but not slower) until Duren would finally "find" the plate. (This should be documented, i.e., when did this actually occur, NOT when did someone repeat it for the umpteenth time without doing research.)
   
 
Duren stayed with the Yankees until May 8, {{By|1961}}, when he was traded to the [[Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim|Los Angeles Angels]]; Duren, [[Johnny James]], and [[Lee Thomas (baseball)|Lee Thomas]] went to the Angels in exchange for [[Tex Clevenger]] and [[Bob Cerv]]. Shortly after being traded to the Angels, he struck out seven successive [[Boston Red Sox|Red Sox]] batters, then an American League record. He was sold to the [[Philadelphia Phillies]] before the {{By|1963}} season. Early in the {{By|1964}} season, he was shipped to the [[Cincinnati Reds]]. Released by Cincinnati in April {{By|1965}}, he was signed by the Phillies; after being released two months later, he caught on with the [[Texas Rangers (baseball)|Washington Senators]], but was released again on August 24 to bring a close to his 10-year Major League career.
 
Duren stayed with the Yankees until May 8, {{By|1961}}, when he was traded to the [[Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim|Los Angeles Angels]]; Duren, [[Johnny James]], and [[Lee Thomas (baseball)|Lee Thomas]] went to the Angels in exchange for [[Tex Clevenger]] and [[Bob Cerv]]. Shortly after being traded to the Angels, he struck out seven successive [[Boston Red Sox|Red Sox]] batters, then an American League record. He was sold to the [[Philadelphia Phillies]] before the {{By|1963}} season. Early in the {{By|1964}} season, he was shipped to the [[Cincinnati Reds]]. Released by Cincinnati in April {{By|1965}}, he was signed by the Phillies; after being released two months later, he caught on with the [[Texas Rangers (baseball)|Washington Senators]], but was released again on August 24 to bring a close to his 10-year Major League career.
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