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Article:National anthem
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Although national anthems are usually in the most common language of the country, whether [[de facto]] or [[Official language|official]], there are notable exceptions. India's anthem, "[[Jana Gana Mana]]", is in a highly [[Sanskrit]]ized version of [[Bengali language|Bengali]]. States with more than one national language may offer several versions of their anthem: For instance, Switzerland's [[Swiss Psalm|anthem]] has different lyrics for each of the country's four official languages (French, German, Italian and [[Romansh language|Romansh]]). Canada's [[O Canada|national anthem]] has different lyrics for both of the country's official languages (English and French), and on some occasions is sung with a mixture of stanzas taken from its French and English versions. The Sri Lankan national anthem has translated lyrics for each of the country's official languages [[Sinhala language|Sinhala]] and [[Tamil language|Tamil]]. It was actually written in [[Sinhala language|Sinhala]], but a Tamil translation is also played on some occasions and mostly played in [[Northern Province, Sri Lanka|Tamil Provinces]] and [[Tamil language|Tamil]] schools. On the other hand, South Africa's [[National anthem of South Africa|national anthem]] is unique in that five of the country's eleven official languages are used in the same anthem (the first [[stanza]] is divided between two languages, with each of the remaining three stanzas in a different language). Apart from ''God Save the Queen'', the New Zealand national anthem is now traditionally sung with the first verse in [[Māori language|Māori]] (''Aotearoa'') and the second in English (''God Defend New Zealand''). The tune is the same but the words are not a direct translation of each other. Another multilingual country, Spain, has no words in its anthem, [[La Marcha Real]], although in 2007 a national competition to write words was unsuccessfully launched.<ref>[http://www.economist.com/node/9558331?story_id=9558331 Lost for words]</ref>
 
Although national anthems are usually in the most common language of the country, whether [[de facto]] or [[Official language|official]], there are notable exceptions. India's anthem, "[[Jana Gana Mana]]", is in a highly [[Sanskrit]]ized version of [[Bengali language|Bengali]]. States with more than one national language may offer several versions of their anthem: For instance, Switzerland's [[Swiss Psalm|anthem]] has different lyrics for each of the country's four official languages (French, German, Italian and [[Romansh language|Romansh]]). Canada's [[O Canada|national anthem]] has different lyrics for both of the country's official languages (English and French), and on some occasions is sung with a mixture of stanzas taken from its French and English versions. The Sri Lankan national anthem has translated lyrics for each of the country's official languages [[Sinhala language|Sinhala]] and [[Tamil language|Tamil]]. It was actually written in [[Sinhala language|Sinhala]], but a Tamil translation is also played on some occasions and mostly played in [[Northern Province, Sri Lanka|Tamil Provinces]] and [[Tamil language|Tamil]] schools. On the other hand, South Africa's [[National anthem of South Africa|national anthem]] is unique in that five of the country's eleven official languages are used in the same anthem (the first [[stanza]] is divided between two languages, with each of the remaining three stanzas in a different language). Apart from ''God Save the Queen'', the New Zealand national anthem is now traditionally sung with the first verse in [[Māori language|Māori]] (''Aotearoa'') and the second in English (''God Defend New Zealand''). The tune is the same but the words are not a direct translation of each other. Another multilingual country, Spain, has no words in its anthem, [[La Marcha Real]], although in 2007 a national competition to write words was unsuccessfully launched.<ref>[http://www.economist.com/node/9558331?story_id=9558331 Lost for words]</ref>
   
==History==
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Hey jacob
{{Refimprove section|date=July 2012}}
 
National anthems rose to prominence in Europe during the 19th century, but some are much older in origin. The oldest national anthem is the "[[Wilhelmus]]", the [[Netherlands|Dutch]] national anthem, written between 1568 and 1572 during the [[Dutch Revolt]], which became the official Dutch national anthem in 1932. The Japanese anthem, "[[Kimi ga Yo]]", has its lyrics taken from a [[Heian period|Heian period (794–1185)]] poem, yet it was not set to music until 1880.<ref name="jpri">Japan Policy Research Institute [http://www.jpri.org/publications/workingpapers/wp79.html JPRI Working Paper No. 79]. The Indian National anthem "Jana Gana Mana" was transcribed from a poem by Rabandrinath Tagore. Published July 2001. Retrieved July 7, 2007</ref> "[[God Save the Queen]]", the national anthem of the United Kingdom and one of the two national anthems of New Zealand, was first performed in 1745 under the title "God Save the King". Spain's national anthem, the "[[Marcha Real]]" (The Royal March), dates from 1770 (written in 1761). The oldest of Denmark's two national anthems, "[[Kong Christian stod ved højen mast]]" was adopted in 1780 and "[[La Marseillaise]]", the French anthem, was written in 1792 and adopted in 1795. [[Serbia]] was the first Eastern European nation to have a national anthem, ''[[Vostani Serbije|Rise up, Serbia!]]'' in 1804.{{Citation needed|date=November 2012}}
 
   
 
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