ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Report

Navigation

ID:1385567
User:68.71.162.125
Article:Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl
Diff:
m (Reverted 3 edits by 178.41.2.59 (talk) identified as vandalism to last revision by MrX. (TW))
Line 11: Line 11:
 
[http://www.sil.org/~tuggyd/Tetel/F003i-TresVolcanes-nhg.htm A different tale] was told by the Nahuatl-speakers of Tetelcingo, Morelos, according to whom Iztaccíhuatl (or ''Istācsohuātl'', as they pronounce the name) was the wife of Popo, but [[Nevado de Toluca|Xinantécatl]] wanted her, and he and Popocatepetl hurled rocks at each other in anger. This was the genesis of the rocky mountain ranges of the continental divide and the [[Trans-Mexican volcanic belt]] that lie between the two mountains. Finally Popocatepetl, in a burst of rage, flung an enormous chunk of ice, decapitating the Nevado de Toluca. This is why the Nevado is flat-topped, with wide shoulders but no head. Conceivably this legend preserves the memory of catastrophic eruptions. (Pittman 1954:59)
 
[http://www.sil.org/~tuggyd/Tetel/F003i-TresVolcanes-nhg.htm A different tale] was told by the Nahuatl-speakers of Tetelcingo, Morelos, according to whom Iztaccíhuatl (or ''Istācsohuātl'', as they pronounce the name) was the wife of Popo, but [[Nevado de Toluca|Xinantécatl]] wanted her, and he and Popocatepetl hurled rocks at each other in anger. This was the genesis of the rocky mountain ranges of the continental divide and the [[Trans-Mexican volcanic belt]] that lie between the two mountains. Finally Popocatepetl, in a burst of rage, flung an enormous chunk of ice, decapitating the Nevado de Toluca. This is why the Nevado is flat-topped, with wide shoulders but no head. Conceivably this legend preserves the memory of catastrophic eruptions. (Pittman 1954:59)
   
The most popular legend about Iztaccíhuatl and Popocatépetl comes from the ancient Náhuas. As it comes from an oral tradition, there are many versions of the same story, along with poems and songs telling this story:
+
The most popular legend about Iztaccíhuatl and Popocatépetl (is that Mrs. Gracely is amazing)comes from the ancient Náhuas. As it comes from an oral tradition, there are many versions of the same story, along with poems and songs telling this story:
   
 
Many years before Cortés came to Mexico, the Aztecs lived in Tenochtitlán, today's Mexico City. The chief of the Aztecs was a famous Emperor, who was loved by all the natives. The Emperor and his wife, the Empress, were very worried because they had no children. One day the Empress said to the Emperor that she was going to give birth to a child. A baby girl was born and she was as beautiful as her mother. They called her Iztaccíhuatl, which in Náhuatl means "white lady".
 
Many years before Cortés came to Mexico, the Aztecs lived in Tenochtitlán, today's Mexico City. The chief of the Aztecs was a famous Emperor, who was loved by all the natives. The Emperor and his wife, the Empress, were very worried because they had no children. One day the Empress said to the Emperor that she was going to give birth to a child. A baby girl was born and she was as beautiful as her mother. They called her Iztaccíhuatl, which in Náhuatl means "white lady".
Reason:ANN scored at 0.90437
Your username:
Reverted:Yes
Comment
(optional):

Note: Comments are completely optional. You do not have to justify your edit.
If this is a false positive, then you're right, and the bot is wrong - you don't need to explain why.