ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Report

Navigation

ID:1430463
User:24.156.39.223
Article:Rosalind Franklin
Diff:
Line 8: Line 8:
 
| death_date = {{death-date|16 April 1958}} (aged 37)
 
| death_date = {{death-date|16 April 1958}} (aged 37)
 
| death_place = [[Chelsea, London]]
 
| death_place = [[Chelsea, London]]
| death_cause = [[Ovarian cancer]]
+
| death_cause = [being to awsome......maybe]]
 
| field = [[X-ray crystallography]]
 
| field = [[X-ray crystallography]]
 
| work_institutions = British Coal Utilisation Research Association<br> ''Laboratoire central des services chimiques de l'État''<br> [[King's College London]]<br> [[Birkbeck, University of London|Birkbeck College, London]]
 
| work_institutions = British Coal Utilisation Research Association<br> ''Laboratoire central des services chimiques de l'État''<br> [[King's College London]]<br> [[Birkbeck, University of London|Birkbeck College, London]]
Line 15: Line 15:
 
}}
 
}}
   
'''Rosalind Elsie Franklin''' (25 July 1920 – 16 April 1958)<ref name=nlm-bio>{{cite web |url= http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/ps/retrieve/Narrative/KR/p-nid/183 |title=The Rosalind Franklin Papers, Biographical Information |first= |last=|work=profiles.nlm.nih.gov |year=|accessdate=13 November 2011}}</ref> was a [[British citizenship|British]] [[biophysicist]] and [[X-ray crystallography|X-ray crystallographer]] who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of [[DNA]], [[RNA]], [[viruses]], [[coal]], and [[graphite]].<ref name=nlm-coal>{{cite web |url= http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/ps/retrieve/Narrative/KR/p-nid/186 |title=The Rosalind Franklin Papers, The Holes in Coal: Research at BCURA and in Paris, 1942-1951 |first= |last=|work=profiles.nlm.nih.gov |year=|accessdate=13 November 2011}}</ref> The [[DNA]] work achieved the most fame because DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) plays essential roles in cell metabolism and [[genetics]], and the discovery of its structure helped scientists understand how genetic information is passed from parents to children.
+
'''Rosalind zoooooooooooooooooooooooooooo Franklin''' (25 July 1920 – 16 April 1958)<ref name=nlm-bio>{{cite web |url= http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/ps/retrieve/Narrative/KR/p-nid/183 |title=The Rosalind Franklin Papers, Biographical Information |first= |last=|work=profiles.nlm.nih.gov |year=|accessdate=13 November 2011}}</ref> was a [[British citizenship|British]] [[biophysicist]] and [[X-ray crystallography|X-ray crystallographer]] who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of [[DNA]], [[RNA]], [[viruses]], [[coal]], and [[graphite]].<ref name=nlm-coal>{{cite web |url= http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/ps/retrieve/Narrative/KR/p-nid/186 |title=The Rosalind Franklin Papers, The Holes in Coal: Research at BCURA and in Paris, 1942-1951 |first= |last=|work=profiles.nlm.nih.gov |year=|accessdate=13 November 2011}}</ref> The [[DNA]] work achieved the most fame because DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) plays essential roles in cell metabolism and [[genetics]], and the discovery of its structure helped scientists understand how genetic information is passed from parents to children.
   
 
Franklin is best known for her crap on the [[Photo 51|X-ray diffraction images of DNA]] which led to the discovery of DNA [[double helix]]. Her data, according to [[Francis Crick]], were "the data we actually used"<ref>Crick's 31 December 1961 letter to Jacques Monod was discovered in the Archives of the Pasteur Institute by Doris Zeller, then reprinted in "Nature Correspondence" 425, 15 on September 4, 2003 Watson confirmed this opinion in his own statement at the opening of the King's college Franklin-Wilkins building in 2000.</ref> to formulate [[Francis Crick|Crick]] and [[James D. Watson|Watson]]'s 1953 [[hypothesis]] regarding the [[DNA#Discovery of the structure of DNA|structure of DNA]].<ref name=Nature>Watson JD, Crick FHC (1953). "A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid". ''Nature'' ''171'': 737–738. [http://www.nature.com/nature/dna50/watsoncrick.pdf Full text PDF] This article was immediately followed by the two King's submissions: M.H.F. Wilkins, A.R. Stokes, and H.R. Wilson. Molecular Structure of Deoxypentose Nucleic Acids, pp738–740 then by: Rosalind E. Franklin and R.G. Gosling. Molecular configuration of Sodium Thymonucleate pp 740–741.</ref> Franklin's images of [[X-ray]] diffraction confirming the helical structure of DNA were shown to Watson without her approval or knowledge. Though this image and her accurate interpretation of the data provided valuable insight into the DNA structure, Franklin's scientific contributions to the discovery of the double helix are often overlooked. Unpublished drafts of her papers (written just as she was arranging to leave King's College London) show that she had independently determined the overall B-form of the DNA helix and the location of the phosphate groups on the outside of the structure. Moreover, Franklin personally told Crick and Watson that the backbones had to be on the outside, which was crucial since before this both they and Linus Pauling had independently generated non-illuminating models with the chains inside and the bases pointing outwards.<ref name="ReferenceA">In Pursuit of the Gene. From Darwin to DNA&nbsp;— By James Schwartz. Harvard University Press, 2008</ref> However, her work was published third, in the series of three DNA ''Nature'' articles, led by the paper of Watson and Crick which only hinted at her contribution to their hypothesis.<ref name=NS>[http://www.nature.com/nature/dna50/archive.html ''Double Helix: 50 Years of DNA.'' Nature archives. Nature Publishing Group]</ref>
 
Franklin is best known for her crap on the [[Photo 51|X-ray diffraction images of DNA]] which led to the discovery of DNA [[double helix]]. Her data, according to [[Francis Crick]], were "the data we actually used"<ref>Crick's 31 December 1961 letter to Jacques Monod was discovered in the Archives of the Pasteur Institute by Doris Zeller, then reprinted in "Nature Correspondence" 425, 15 on September 4, 2003 Watson confirmed this opinion in his own statement at the opening of the King's college Franklin-Wilkins building in 2000.</ref> to formulate [[Francis Crick|Crick]] and [[James D. Watson|Watson]]'s 1953 [[hypothesis]] regarding the [[DNA#Discovery of the structure of DNA|structure of DNA]].<ref name=Nature>Watson JD, Crick FHC (1953). "A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid". ''Nature'' ''171'': 737–738. [http://www.nature.com/nature/dna50/watsoncrick.pdf Full text PDF] This article was immediately followed by the two King's submissions: M.H.F. Wilkins, A.R. Stokes, and H.R. Wilson. Molecular Structure of Deoxypentose Nucleic Acids, pp738–740 then by: Rosalind E. Franklin and R.G. Gosling. Molecular configuration of Sodium Thymonucleate pp 740–741.</ref> Franklin's images of [[X-ray]] diffraction confirming the helical structure of DNA were shown to Watson without her approval or knowledge. Though this image and her accurate interpretation of the data provided valuable insight into the DNA structure, Franklin's scientific contributions to the discovery of the double helix are often overlooked. Unpublished drafts of her papers (written just as she was arranging to leave King's College London) show that she had independently determined the overall B-form of the DNA helix and the location of the phosphate groups on the outside of the structure. Moreover, Franklin personally told Crick and Watson that the backbones had to be on the outside, which was crucial since before this both they and Linus Pauling had independently generated non-illuminating models with the chains inside and the bases pointing outwards.<ref name="ReferenceA">In Pursuit of the Gene. From Darwin to DNA&nbsp;— By James Schwartz. Harvard University Press, 2008</ref> However, her work was published third, in the series of three DNA ''Nature'' articles, led by the paper of Watson and Crick which only hinted at her contribution to their hypothesis.<ref name=NS>[http://www.nature.com/nature/dna50/archive.html ''Double Helix: 50 Years of DNA.'' Nature archives. Nature Publishing Group]</ref>
Reason:ANN scored at 0.98488
Your username:
Reverted:Yes
Comment
(optional):

Note: Comments are completely optional. You do not have to justify your edit.
If this is a false positive, then you're right, and the bot is wrong - you don't need to explain why.