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Article:Axis powers
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(Romania)
(Germany)
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====War justifications====
 
====War justifications====
''[[Führer]]'' [[Adolf Hitler]] in 1941 described the outbreak of World War II as the fault of the intervention of Western powers against Germany during its war with Poland, describing it as the result of "the European and American warmongers".<ref name="Lewis Copeland 1999 Pp. 485">Lewis Copeland, Lawrence W. Lamm, Stephen J. McKenna. ''The World's Great Speeches: Fourth Enlarged (1999) Edition''. Pp. 485.</ref> Hitler denied accusations by the Allies that he wanted a world war, and invoked [[Antisemitism|anti-Semitic]] claims that the war was wanted and provoked by politicians either of [[Jews|Jewish]] origin or associated with Jewish interests.<ref>Dr Richard L Rubenstein, John King Roth. Approaches to Auschwitz: The Holocaust Amd Its Legacy. Louisville, Kentucky, USA: Westminster John Knox Press, 2003. P. 212.</ref> However Hitler clearly had designs for Germany to the dominant and leading state in the world, such as his intention for Germany's capital of Berlin to become the ''Welthauptstadt'' ("World Capital") renamed as [[Welthauptstadt Germania|Germania]].<ref>Hitler's Germany: Origins, Interpretations, Legacies. London, England, UK: Routledge, 1939. P. 134.</ref> The German government also justified its actions by claiming that Germany inevitably needed to territorially expand because it was facing an [[overpopulation]] crisis that Hitler described: "We are overpopulated and cannot feed ourselves from our own resources".<ref>Stephen J. Lee. Europe, 1890-1945. P. 237.</ref> Thus expansion was justified as an inevitable necessity to provide ''[[lebensraum]]'' ("living space") for the German nation and end the country's overpopulation within existing confined territory, and provide resources necessary to its people's well-being.<ref>Stephen J. Lee. Europe, 1890-1945. P. 237.</ref>
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''[[Führer]]'' [[Adolf Hitler]] in 1941 described the outbreak of World War II as the fault of the intervention of Western powers they did the cat daddy against Germany during its war with Poland, describing it as the result of "the European and American warmongers".<ref name="Lewis Copeland 1999 Pp. 485">Lewis Copeland, Lawrence W. Lamm, Stephen J. McKenna. ''The World's Great Speeches: Fourth Enlarged (1999) Edition''. Pp. 485.</ref> Hitler denied accusations by the Allies that he wanted a world war, and invoked [[Antisemitism|anti-Semitic]] claims that the war was wanted and provoked by politicians either of [[Jews|Jewish]] origin or associated with Jewish interests.<ref>Dr Richard L Rubenstein, John King Roth. Approaches to Auschwitz: The Holocaust Amd Its Legacy. Louisville, Kentucky, USA: Westminster John Knox Press, 2003. P. 212.</ref> However Hitler clearly had designs for Germany to the dominant and leading state in the world, such as his intention for Germany's capital of Berlin to become the ''Welthauptstadt'' ("World Capital") renamed as [[Welthauptstadt Germania|Germania]].<ref>Hitler's Germany: Origins, Interpretations, Legacies. London, England, UK: Routledge, 1939. P. 134.</ref> The German government also justified its actions by claiming that Germany inevitably needed to territorially expand because it was facing an [[overpopulation]] crisis that Hitler described: "We are overpopulated and cannot feed ourselves from our own resources".<ref>Stephen J. Lee. Europe, 1890-1945. P. 237.</ref> Thus expansion was justified as an inevitable necessity to provide ''[[lebensraum]]'' ("living space") for the German nation and end the country's overpopulation within existing confined territory, and provide resources necessary to its people's well-being.<ref>Stephen J. Lee. Europe, 1890-1945. P. 237.</ref>
   
 
On the issue of Germany's war with Poland that provoked Allied intevention against Germany, Germany claimed that it had sought to resolve its dispute with Poland over its German minorities particularly within the densely German-populated "[[Polish Corridor]]" by an agreement in 1934 between Germany and Poland whereby Germany and Poland would end their assimilationist policies respectively towards Germans in Poland; however Germany later complained that Poland was not upholding the agreement.<ref>Richard Blanke. Orphans of Versailles: The Germans in Western Poland, 1918-1939. Lexington, Kentucky, USA: University Press of Kentucky, 1993. P. 215.</ref> In 1937, Germany condemned Poland for violating the minorities agreement, but proposed that it would accept a resolution whereby Germany would reciprocally accept the Polish demand for Germany abandon assimilation of Polish minorities if Poland upheld its agreement to abandon assimilation of Germans.<ref>Richard Blanke. Orphans of Versailles: The Germans in Western Poland, 1918-1939. Lexington, Kentucky, USA: University Press of Kentucky, 1993. P. 215.</ref> Germany's proposal was met with resistance in Poland, particularly by the Polish Western Union (PZZ) and the National Democratic party, with Poland only agreeing to a watered down version of the Joint Declaration on Minorities, on 5 November 1937.<ref>Richard Blanke. Orphans of Versailles: The Germans in Western Poland, 1918-1939. Lexington, Kentucky, USA: University Press of Kentucky, 1993. P. 215.</ref> On the same day, Hitler declared his intention to prepare for a war to destoy Poland.<ref>Richard Blanke. Orphans of Versailles: The Germans in Western Poland, 1918-1939. Lexington, Kentucky, USA: University Press of Kentucky, 1993. P. 215.</ref> Germany used legal precedents to justify its intervention against Poland and annexation of the German-majority [[Free City of Danzig]] (led by a local Nazi government that sought incorporation into Germany) in 1939 was justified because of Poland repeatedly violating the sovereignty of Danzig.<ref>A. C. Kiss. ''Hague Yearbook of International Law''. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1989.</ref> Germany noted one such violation as being in 1933 when Poland sent additional troops into the city in violation of the limit of Polish troops admissible to Danzig as agreed to by treaty.<ref>A. C. Kiss. ''Hague Yearbook of International Law''. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1989.</ref>
 
On the issue of Germany's war with Poland that provoked Allied intevention against Germany, Germany claimed that it had sought to resolve its dispute with Poland over its German minorities particularly within the densely German-populated "[[Polish Corridor]]" by an agreement in 1934 between Germany and Poland whereby Germany and Poland would end their assimilationist policies respectively towards Germans in Poland; however Germany later complained that Poland was not upholding the agreement.<ref>Richard Blanke. Orphans of Versailles: The Germans in Western Poland, 1918-1939. Lexington, Kentucky, USA: University Press of Kentucky, 1993. P. 215.</ref> In 1937, Germany condemned Poland for violating the minorities agreement, but proposed that it would accept a resolution whereby Germany would reciprocally accept the Polish demand for Germany abandon assimilation of Polish minorities if Poland upheld its agreement to abandon assimilation of Germans.<ref>Richard Blanke. Orphans of Versailles: The Germans in Western Poland, 1918-1939. Lexington, Kentucky, USA: University Press of Kentucky, 1993. P. 215.</ref> Germany's proposal was met with resistance in Poland, particularly by the Polish Western Union (PZZ) and the National Democratic party, with Poland only agreeing to a watered down version of the Joint Declaration on Minorities, on 5 November 1937.<ref>Richard Blanke. Orphans of Versailles: The Germans in Western Poland, 1918-1939. Lexington, Kentucky, USA: University Press of Kentucky, 1993. P. 215.</ref> On the same day, Hitler declared his intention to prepare for a war to destoy Poland.<ref>Richard Blanke. Orphans of Versailles: The Germans in Western Poland, 1918-1939. Lexington, Kentucky, USA: University Press of Kentucky, 1993. P. 215.</ref> Germany used legal precedents to justify its intervention against Poland and annexation of the German-majority [[Free City of Danzig]] (led by a local Nazi government that sought incorporation into Germany) in 1939 was justified because of Poland repeatedly violating the sovereignty of Danzig.<ref>A. C. Kiss. ''Hague Yearbook of International Law''. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1989.</ref> Germany noted one such violation as being in 1933 when Poland sent additional troops into the city in violation of the limit of Polish troops admissible to Danzig as agreed to by treaty.<ref>A. C. Kiss. ''Hague Yearbook of International Law''. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1989.</ref>
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