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ID:1459700
User:12.28.104.10
Article:Abnormal behaviour of birds in captivity
Diff:
(General tidy. Behavior>Behaviour to be consistent with title)
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*Jealous, over-possessive parrot<ref name=bchannel>{{cite web|last=Davis|first=Chris|title=Jealousy And Your Bird|url=http://www.birdchannel.com/bird-behavior-and-training/bird-behavior-issues/bird-jealousy.aspx|publisher=birdchannel.com|accessdate=29 July 2012}}</ref>
 
*Jealous, over-possessive parrot<ref name=bchannel>{{cite web|last=Davis|first=Chris|title=Jealousy And Your Bird|url=http://www.birdchannel.com/bird-behavior-and-training/bird-behavior-issues/bird-jealousy.aspx|publisher=birdchannel.com|accessdate=29 July 2012}}</ref>
 
*Laying infertile eggs {{citation needed|date=July 2012}}
 
*Laying infertile eggs {{citation needed|date=July 2012}}
*Chronic egg laying<ref name=speer>{{cite web|last=Speer|first=Brian|title=Ask An Expert|url=http://www.parrots.org/index.php/forumsandexperts/answers/ask_an_expert43/|publisher=World Parrot Trust|accessdate=6 July 2012}}</ref><ref name=clark>{{cite web|last=Clark|first=Pamela|title=Hormonal Behavior: Is Your Parrot A Victim?|url=http://pamelaclarkonline.com/uploads/Hormonal_Behavior.pdf|accessdate=20 December 2012}}</ref>
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*[[Chronic egg laying]]<ref name=speer>{{cite web|last=Speer|first=Brian|title=Ask An Expert|url=http://www.parrots.org/index.php/forumsandexperts/answers/ask_an_expert43/|publisher=World Parrot Trust|accessdate=6 July 2012}}</ref><ref name=clark>{{cite web|last=Clark|first=Pamela|title=Hormonal Behavior: Is Your Parrot A Victim?|url=http://pamelaclarkonline.com/uploads/Hormonal_Behavior.pdf|accessdate=20 December 2012}}</ref>
   
 
<br />When analyzing the behaviour of birds in captivity, what is considered normal or abnormal behaviour is dependent on the form and frequency that the particular behaviour is expressed in the natural environment.<ref>Wiepkema, P.R. (1985). Abnormal behavior in farm animals: ethological implications. Netherlands Journal of Zoology, 35, 279-299.</ref> Birds raised in pet stores tend to be raised with other birds, however, after being sold and taken to the owner's home, birds in captivity are often housed in isolation and in environments lacking abundant resources orcomplex stimuli. In the United States, it is estimated that forty million birds are kept caged and improperly cared for.<ref>“There is no such thing as a cage bird”. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. <http://www.peta.org/issues/companion-animals/caging-birds.aspx></ref> Because of these inappropriate housing conditions, abnormal behaviour patterns may appear in [[birdcage|caged birds]] kept as pets. Once established, thess abnormal behaviours in birds are often not alterable.<ref>Ten Cate, C. (1995). Behavioral development in birds and the implications of imprinting and song learning for captive propagation. Research and captive propagation, 187-197.</ref>
 
<br />When analyzing the behaviour of birds in captivity, what is considered normal or abnormal behaviour is dependent on the form and frequency that the particular behaviour is expressed in the natural environment.<ref>Wiepkema, P.R. (1985). Abnormal behavior in farm animals: ethological implications. Netherlands Journal of Zoology, 35, 279-299.</ref> Birds raised in pet stores tend to be raised with other birds, however, after being sold and taken to the owner's home, birds in captivity are often housed in isolation and in environments lacking abundant resources orcomplex stimuli. In the United States, it is estimated that forty million birds are kept caged and improperly cared for.<ref>“There is no such thing as a cage bird”. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. <http://www.peta.org/issues/companion-animals/caging-birds.aspx></ref> Because of these inappropriate housing conditions, abnormal behaviour patterns may appear in [[birdcage|caged birds]] kept as pets. Once established, thess abnormal behaviours in birds are often not alterable.<ref>Ten Cate, C. (1995). Behavioral development in birds and the implications of imprinting and song learning for captive propagation. Research and captive propagation, 187-197.</ref>
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