ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Report

Navigation

ID:1464472
User:75.117.151.194
Article:Americas
Diff:
(Offensively enough, people do use the term)
(Tag: possible vandalism)
Line 2: Line 2:
 
{{pp-move-indef}}
 
{{pp-move-indef}}
 
{{Infobox Continent
 
{{Infobox Continent
|title = The Americas
+
|title = The Americas [[Haitian Creole]], [[Guaraní language|Guaraní]], [[Aymara language|Aymara]], [[Dutch language|Dutch]] and [[Americas#Languages|many others]]
|image = [[File:Americas (orthographic projection).svg|300px|200px]]
 
|area = 42,549,000&nbsp;km<sup>2</sup>
 
|population = 911,000,000 (July 2008 est.)
 
|density = 21/km<sup>2</sup> (55/sq mi)
 
|demonym = [[American (word)|American]]<ref>{{OED|American}}</ref> (but see [[#English usage|usage]])
 
|countries = 35
 
|list_countries =
 
|dependencies =
 
|languages = [[Spanish language|Spanish]], [[English language|English]], [[Portuguese language|Portuguese]], <br />[[French language|French]], [[Quechua languages|Quechua]], [[Haitian Creole]], [[Guaraní language|Guaraní]], [[Aymara language|Aymara]], [[Dutch language|Dutch]] and [[Americas#Languages|many others]]
 
 
|time = [[UTC-10]] to [[UTC±0|UTC]]
 
|time = [[UTC-10]] to [[UTC±0|UTC]]
 
|cities =
 
|cities =
 
}}
 
}}
   
The '''Americas''' (or '''America''')<ref>See for example: [http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/america america – Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary]. Retrieved on January 27, 2008; "[http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/america dictionary.reference.com america]". Dictionary.com. The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004. Accessed: January 27, 2008.</ref><ref>Marjorie Fee and Janice MacAlpine, ''Oxford Guide to Canadian English Usage'' (2008) page 36 says "In Canada, ''American'' is used almost exclusively in reference to the United States and its citizens." Others, including ''The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary'', ''The Canadian Oxford Dictionary'', ''The Australian Oxford Dictionary'' and ''The Concise Oxford English Dictionary'' all specify both the Americas and the United States in their definition of "American".</ref><ref name=oxfordc>"America." ''The Oxford Companion to the English Language'' (ISBN 0-19-214183-X). McArthur, Tom, ed., 1992. New York: Oxford University Press, p. 33: "[16c: from the feminine of ''Americus'', the Latinized first name of the explorer Amerigo Vespucci (1454–1512). The name ''America'' first appeared on a map in 1507 by the German cartographer Martin Waldseemüller, referring to the area now called Brazil]. Since the 16c, a name of the western hemisphere, often in the plural ''Americas'' and more or less synonymous with ''the New World''. Since the 18c, a name of the United States of America. The second sense is now primary in English: ... However, the term is open to uncertainties: ..."</ref> are lands in the [[Western Hemisphere]] that are also known as the [[New World]]. Comprising the [[continent]]s of [[North America]] and [[South America]],<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/134805/continent |title=Continent |work=Encyclopaedia Britannica |publisher= |accessdate=31 October 2012}}</ref> along with their associated [[Lists of islands of the Americas|islands]], they cover 8.3% of the Earth's total surface area (28.4% of its land area). The topography is dominated by the [[American Cordillera]], a long chain of mountains that run the length of the west coast. The flatter eastern side of the Americas is dominated by large river basins, such as the [[Amazon river basin|Amazon]], [[Mississippi river basin|Mississippi]], and [[La Plata river basin|La Plata]]. Extending {{convert|14000|km|0|abbr=on}} in a north-south orientation, the climate and ecology varies strongly across the Americas, from arctic [[tundra]] of [[Northern Canada]], [[Greenland]], and [[Alaska]], to the [[tropical rain forest]]s in [[Central America]] and South America. When the continents joined 3 million years ago, the [[Great American Interchange]] resulted in many species being spread across the Americas, such as the [[cougar]], [[New World porcupine|porcupine]], and [[hummingbird]]s.
+
The '''Americas''' (or '''America''')<ref>Simary in English: ... However, the term is open to uncertainties: ..."</ref> are lands in the [[Western Hemisphere]] that are ar, t
 
Humans first [[Settlement of the Americas|settled the Americas]] from Asia between 40,000 BCE and 15,000 BCE. A second migration of [[Na-Dene languages|Na-Dene speakers]] followed later from Asia. The subsequent migration of the [[Inuit]] into the [[neoarctic]] around 3500 BCE completed what is generally regarded as the settlement by the [[Indigenous peoples of the Americas]]. The first European discovery of and settlement in the Americas was by the [[Norsemen|Norse]] explorer [[Leif Ericson]]. However the colonization never became permanent and was later abandoned. The [[voyages of Christopher Columbus]] from 1492 to 1502 resulted in permanent contact with European (and subsequently, other [[Old World]]) powers, which led to the [[Columbian exchange]]. Diseases introduced from Europe and Africa [[Population history of indigenous peoples of the Americas|devastated the Indigenous peoples]], and the European powers [[European colonization of the Americas|colonised the Americas]].<ref>[examiner.com/article/apocalypic-mysterious-plague-killed-millions-of-native-americans-the-1500s Examiner, 2012]</ref> Mass emigration from Europe, including large numbers of [[indentured servant]]s, and [[Atlantic slave trade|forced immigration of African slaves]] largely replaced the Indigenous Peoples. Beginning with the [[American Revolution]] in 1776 and [[Haitian Revolution]] in 1791, the European powers began to [[Decolonization of the Americas|decolonise the Americas]]. Currently, almost all of the population of the Americas resides in independent countries; however, the legacy of the colonisation and settlement by Europeans is that the Americas share many common cultural traits, most notably the predominant adherence to [[Christianity]] and use of [[Indo-European languages]]; primarily [[Spanish language in the Americas|Spanish]], [[English language|English]], and [[Portuguese in the Americas|Portuguese]]. More than 900 million people live in the Americas (about 13.5% of the [[World population|human population]]), the most populous countries being the [[United States]], [[Brazil]], and [[Mexico]], the most populous cities being [[Mexico City]], [[São Paulo]], and [[New York City]].
 
 
== <span id="Naming">Etymology and naming</span> ==
 
[[Image:Waldseemuller map 2.jpg|thumb|World map of [[Martin Waldseemüller|Waldseemüller]] (Germany, 1507), which first used the name America (in the lower-left section, over South America)]]
 
The earliest known use of the name ''America'' dates to April 25, 1507, where it was applied to what is now known as South America. It appears on a small globe map with twelve time zones, together with the largest wall map made to date, both created by the German [[cartographer]] [[Martin Waldseemüller]] in [[Saint-Dié-des-Vosges]] in France. These were the first maps to show the Americas as a land mass separate from Asia. An accompanying book, ''[[Cosmographiae Introductio]]'', anonymous but apparently written by Waldseemüller's collaborator [[Matthias Ringmann]],<ref name=Smiths>{{Cite journal | last1 = Toby Lester | first1 = December | year = 2009 | title = Putting America on the Map | url = | journal = Smithsonian | volume = 40 | page = 9 }}</ref> states, "I do not see what right any one would have to object to calling this part [that is, the South American mainland], after Americus who discovered it and who is a man of intelligence, Amerigen, that is, the Land of Americus, or America: since both Europa and Asia got their names from women". ''Americus Vespucius'' is the [[Latin]]ized version of the [[Florence|Florentine]] explorer [[Amerigo Vespucci]]'s name, and ''America'' is the feminine form of ''Americus''. ''Amerigen'' is explained as ''Amerigo'' plus ''gen,'' the [[accusative case]] of the Greek word for 'earth', and meaning 'land of Amerigo'.<ref name=Smiths/> (See [[wiktionary:America#Etymology|etymology]].) ''Amerigo'' itself is an Italian form of the medieval Latin ''Emericus'' (see also [[Emeric of Hungary (saint)|Saint Emeric of Hungary]]), which through the German form [[Heinrich]] (in English, [[Henry (given name)|Henry]]) derived from the [[Germanic languages|Germanic]] name ''[[Haimirich]]''.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/1/Amerigo |title=Amerigo – meaning of Amerigo name |publisher=Thinkbabynames.com |accessdate=July 27, 2010| archiveurl= http://web.archive.org/web/20100712112455/http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/1/Amerigo| archivedate= July 12, 2010 <!--DASHBot-->| deadurl= no}}</ref>
 
 
Vespucci was apparently unaware of the use of his name to refer to the new landmass, as Waldseemüller's maps did not reach Spain until a few years after his death.<ref name=Smiths/> Ringmann may have been misled into crediting Vespucci by the widely published Soderini Letter, a sensationalized version of one of Vespucci's actual letters reporting on the mapping of the South American coast, which glamorized his discoveries and implied that he had recognized that South America was a continent separate from Asia; in fact, it is not known what Vespucci believed on this count, and he may have died believing what Columbus had, that they had reached the East Indies in Asia rather than a new continent.<ref name=BBC1>{{Cite news|url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8328878.stm |title=UK &#124; Magazine &#124; The map that changed the world |publisher=BBC News |date=October 28, 2009 |accessdate=July 27, 2010}}</ref> Spain officially refused to accept the name ''America'' for two centuries, saying that Columbus should get credit, and Waldseemüller's later maps, after Ringmann's death, did not include it; however, usage was established when [[Gerardus Mercator]] applied the name to the entire New World in his 1538 world map. Acceptance may have been aided by the "natural poetic counterpart" that the name ''America'' made with ''Asia, Africa,'' and ''Europa.''<ref name=Smiths/>
 
 
== Geography ==
 
{{Further|Geography of North America|Geography of South America}}
 
 
=== Extent ===
 
The northernmost point of the Americas is [[Kaffeklubben Island]], which is the most northerly point of land on Earth.<ref>{{Cite news|url = http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/06/17/BAG4J779M31.DTL&type=science|title = Romancing the north Berkeley explorer may have stepped on ancient Thule|author = Charles Burress|work=San Francisco Chronicle|date = June 17, 2004}}</ref> The southernmost point is the islands of [[Southern Thule]], although they are sometimes considered part of [[Antarctica]].<ref>{{cite web|url = http://www.coolantarctica.com/Travel/south_georgia_south_sandwich_islands.htm|title = South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, Antarctica – Travel}}</ref> The mainland of the Americas is the world's longest north-to-south landmass. The distance between its two polar extremities, the [[Boothia Peninsula]] in northern Canada and [[Cape Froward]] in Chilean [[Patagonia]], is roughly {{convert|14000|km|mi|abbr=on}}.<ref name="worldbook">{{cite encyclopedia|title = America|encyclopedia = The World Book Encyclopedia|volume = 1|pages = 407|publisher = World Book, Inc|year = 2006|isbn = 0-7166-0106-0}}</ref> The mainland's most westerly point is the end of the [[Seward Peninsula]] in Alaska; [[Attu Island]], further off the Alaskan coast to the west, is considered the westernmost point of the Americas. [[Ponta do Seixas]] in northeastern Brazil forms the easternmost extremity of the mainland,<ref name="worldbook"/> while [[Nordostrundingen]], in Greenland, is the most easterly point of the continental shelf.
 
 
=== Geology ===
 
South America broke off from the west of the [[supercontinent]] [[Gondwana]] around 135&nbsp;million years ago, forming its own continent.<ref>{{Cite journal|author = Brian C. Story|journal = Nature|date = September 28, 1995|title = The role of mantle plumes in continental breakup: case histories from Gondwanaland|volume = 377|pages = 301–309|doi = 10.1038/377301a0|issue=6547}}</ref> Around 15&nbsp;million years ago, the collision of the [[Caribbean Plate]] and the [[Pacific Plate]] resulted in the emergence of a series of volcanoes along the border that created a number of islands. The gaps in the archipelago of Central America filled in with material eroded off North America and South America, plus new land created by continued volcanism. By 3&nbsp;million years ago, the continents of North America and South America were linked by the [[Isthmus of Panama]], thereby forming the single landmass of the Americas.<ref>{{cite web|url = http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/andes/bridge.html|title = Land bridge: How did the formation of a sliver of land result in major changes in biodiversity|publisher = Public Broadcasting Corporation}}</ref>
 
 
=== Topography ===
 
 
[[File:Aconcagua.8.22.03w.jpg|thumb|right|250px|[[Aconcagua]], the highest peak in the Americas]]
 
[[File:Aconcagua.8.22.03w.jpg|thumb|right|250px|[[Aconcagua]], the highest peak in the Americas]]
 
The western geography of the Americas is dominated by the [[American cordillera]], with the [[Andes]] running along the west coast of South America<ref>{{cite web|url = http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/andes.htm|title = Andes Mountain Range}}</ref> and the [[Rocky Mountains]] and other [[North American Cordillera]] ranges running along the western side of North America.<ref>{{cite web|url = http://biology.usgs.gov/s+t/SNT/noframe/wm146.htm | title = Rocky Mountains}}</ref> The {{convert|2300|km|0|abbr=on}} long [[Appalachian Mountains]] run along the east coast of North America from [[Alabama]] to [[Newfoundland (island)|Newfoundland]].<ref>{{cite web|url = http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/entry.php?rec=2067|title = Appalachian Mountains|publisher = Ohio History Central}}</ref> North of the Appalachians, the [[Arctic Cordillera]] runs along the eastern coast of Canada.<ref>{{cite web|url = http://www.evergreen.ca/nativeplants/learn-more/arctic-cordillera.php|title = Arctic Cordillera}}</ref>
 
The western geography of the Americas is dominated by the [[American cordillera]], with the [[Andes]] running along the west coast of South America<ref>{{cite web|url = http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/andes.htm|title = Andes Mountain Range}}</ref> and the [[Rocky Mountains]] and other [[North American Cordillera]] ranges running along the western side of North America.<ref>{{cite web|url = http://biology.usgs.gov/s+t/SNT/noframe/wm146.htm | title = Rocky Mountains}}</ref> The {{convert|2300|km|0|abbr=on}} long [[Appalachian Mountains]] run along the east coast of North America from [[Alabama]] to [[Newfoundland (island)|Newfoundland]].<ref>{{cite web|url = http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/entry.php?rec=2067|title = Appalachian Mountains|publisher = Ohio History Central}}</ref> North of the Appalachians, the [[Arctic Cordillera]] runs along the eastern coast of Canada.<ref>{{cite web|url = http://www.evergreen.ca/nativeplants/learn-more/arctic-cordillera.php|title = Arctic Cordillera}}</ref>
Line 888: Line 888:
 
[[bat-smg:Amerėka]]
 
[[bat-smg:Amerėka]]
 
[[zh:美洲]]
 
[[zh:美洲]]
  +
My attack on america is coming soon, prepare, many lives will be lost... the life of Bin Laden shall be avenged. You are all going to die under my hand.
Reason:ANN scored at 0.915586
Your username:
Reverted:Yes
Comment
(optional):

Note: Comments are completely optional. You do not have to justify your edit.
If this is a false positive, then you're right, and the bot is wrong - you don't need to explain why.