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ID:1505340
User:202.6.147.210
Article:Tiliqua rugosa
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It has a triangular head and a bright blue tongue.<ref name="pianka"/> Its short, stumpy tail is similar in shape to its head. This possibly evolved as a defence mechanism against predators, and has led to the common name of "two-headed skink".<ref name="pianka"/> Its short tail also contains fat reserves, which the lizard lives upon during hibernation in winter.<ref name="pianka"/> Unlike many skinks, shinglebacks do not exhibit [[autotomy]] and cannot shed their tails.<ref>http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/lizards/nose/shingle.php</ref>
 
It has a triangular head and a bright blue tongue.<ref name="pianka"/> Its short, stumpy tail is similar in shape to its head. This possibly evolved as a defence mechanism against predators, and has led to the common name of "two-headed skink".<ref name="pianka"/> Its short tail also contains fat reserves, which the lizard lives upon during hibernation in winter.<ref name="pianka"/> Unlike many skinks, shinglebacks do not exhibit [[autotomy]] and cannot shed their tails.<ref>http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/lizards/nose/shingle.php</ref>
   
==Diet==
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''''''=b|upright|front view]]
[[File:ShingleBack.jpg|thumb|upright|front view]]
 
 
''Tiliqua rugosa'' is an [[omnivore]] that eat snails, insects, [[carrion]], vegetation and flowers. The species was once preyed upon by [[dingo]]s, Australian pythons such as ''[[Morelia spilota]]'', and [[Indigenous Australian|local peoples]]; a threat is now more likely to come from large, introduced [[feral]] species, such as [[fox]]es and [[cat]]s.<ref>{{cite journal|author = C. M. Bull , and Y. Pamula| title = Enhanced vigilance in monogamous pairs of the lizard, Tiliqua rugosa | journal = Behavioural Ecology| publisher = Oxford University Press | volume = 9 | issue = 5 | pages= Pp. 452–455|year = 1998|url=http://beheco.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/9/5/452 | format = PDF | issn = 1465-7279 |accessdate= 2008-04-12|doi = 10.1093/beheco/9.5.452}}</ref>
 
''Tiliqua rugosa'' is an [[omnivore]] that eat snails, insects, [[carrion]], vegetation and flowers. The species was once preyed upon by [[dingo]]s, Australian pythons such as ''[[Morelia spilota]]'', and [[Indigenous Australian|local peoples]]; a threat is now more likely to come from large, introduced [[feral]] species, such as [[fox]]es and [[cat]]s.<ref>{{cite journal|author = C. M. Bull , and Y. Pamula| title = Enhanced vigilance in monogamous pairs of the lizard, Tiliqua rugosa | journal = Behavioural Ecology| publisher = Oxford University Press | volume = 9 | issue = 5 | pages= Pp. 452–455|year = 1998|url=http://beheco.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/9/5/452 | format = PDF | issn = 1465-7279 |accessdate= 2008-04-12|doi = 10.1093/beheco/9.5.452}}</ref>
   
They have also been known to eat human food, such as sausage and chicken, as well as fruits such as banana and passionfruit.
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They have also been known to eat human food, such as pizza and icecream and their
   
 
==In captivity==
 
==In captivity==
Reason:ANN scored at 0.850876
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