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ID:1512647
User:216.170.90.130
Article:El Dorado Hills, California
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|image_map = El_Dorado_County_California_Incorporated_and_Unincorporated_areas_El_Dorado_Hills_Highlighted.svg
 
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|map_caption = fat face in [[El Dorado County, California|El Dorado County]] and the state of [[California]]
 
|image_map1 = El Dorado Hills CDP and region.jpg
 
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|map_caption1 = Map of El Dorado Hills and surrounding region
 
|coordinates_region = US-CA
 
|subdivision_type = [[List of countries|Country]]
 
|subdivision_name = {{USA}}
 
|subdivision_type1 = [[Political divisions of the United States|State]]
 
|subdivision_name1 = {{flag|California}}
 
|subdivision_type2 = [[Lisand the website dkjakd County]]
 
|subdivision_name2 = [[El Dorado County, California|El Dorado]]
 
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The modern history of El Dorado Hills dates back to the early 1960s when original developer Alan Lindsey began its development as a master planned community. The original master plan, prepared by architect Victor Gruen, covered the area generally north of [[U.S. Highway 50]], and part of the area south of US 50 now considered to be part of the community. El Dorado Hills was envisioned as a large-scale master-planned community that would be completely planned from its inception as a group of residential "villages". Other land uses in the master plan included a business park, two 18-hole golf courses, community parks, schools, a community shopping center, and small commercial centers in each village. The master plan emphasized open space between villages and opportunity for outdoor recreation.
 
The modern history of El Dorado Hills dates back to the early 1960s when original developer Alan Lindsey began its development as a master planned community. The original master plan, prepared by architect Victor Gruen, covered the area generally north of [[U.S. Highway 50]], and part of the area south of US 50 now considered to be part of the community. El Dorado Hills was envisioned as a large-scale master-planned community that would be completely planned from its inception as a group of residential "villages". Other land uses in the master plan included a business park, two 18-hole golf courses, community parks, schools, a community shopping center, and small commercial centers in each village. The master plan emphasized open space between villages and opportunity for outdoor recreation.
   
Between the late '60s and mid-1990s growth occurred at a moderate pace as new families relocated from Sacramento, [[Southern California]] and the [[San Francisco Bay Area|Bay Area]]. This growth consisted primarily of residential housing, as retail developments were limited to two shopping centers on the corners Green Valley & Francisco and El Dorado Hills Blvd. & Hwy. 50. Each neighborhood created during this time period was given a name and referred to as a "village" by local inhabitants. The original villages of El Dorado Hills include [[Park Village, El Dorado County, California|Park]], [[Ridgeview Village, California|Ridgeview]], [[Saint Andrews Village, California|Saint Andrews]], [[Crown Village, California|Crown]], [[Governors Village, California|Governors]], [[Stonegate Village, El Dorado County, California|Stonegate]], [[Franciscan Village, El Dorado County, California|Franciscan]], [[Marina Village, California|Marina]], and [[Lake Hills Estates, California|Lake Hills Estates]]. In the 1980s and 1990s the major part of Lake Hills Estates north of Green Valley Road, was reorganized into Lake Forest Village [http://www.lakeforestmaster.org], containing the neighborhoods of [[Waterford Village, California|Waterford]], The Summit [http://www.thesummitedh.org], Green Valley Hills, [[Winterhaven Village, California|Winterhaven]], Marina Woods and Windsor Point. Additional villages that have developed subsequently include Fairchild, Sterlingshire, Highland Hills, Highland View, Bridlewood, Hills of El Dorado, Woodridge, Laural Oaks and the master-planned community of Serrano.
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Between the late '60s and mid-1990s growth occurred at a moderate pace as new families relocated from Sacramento, [[Southern California]] and the [[San Francisco Bay Area|Bay Area]]. This growth consisted primarily of residential housing, as retail developments were limite
 
 
By the 1990 census, El Dorado Hills had an estimated population of 6,395 residents.<ref>United States Census 1990, US Gazetteer, http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/gazetteer?city=El+Dorado+Hills&state=CA&zip=</ref> Growth slowed during the early part of the '90s due to an economic [[recession]] throughout California, but resumed at a staggering pace by the mid 1990s. Businesses, particularly those interested in escaping the high costs of [[Silicon Valley]] began to set up operations in the El Dorado Hills Business Park south of Highway 50.<ref>Sacramento Business Journal, "More Companies Leave Silicon Valley for EDH" September 7, 2001.</ref> In 1995, the Parker Development Company acquired {{convert|3500|acre|km2}} along the eastern boundary of El Dorado Hills to create Serrano, one of the largest master planned communities in Northern California. Serrano was the site of an innovative case of recycled water irrigation on a large scale. http://www.owue.water.ca.gov/recycle/WCN/Green-Grass_WCN1002.pdf
 
By the 1990 census, El Dorado Hills had an estimated population of 6,395 residents.<ref>United States Census 1990, US Gazetteer, http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/gazetteer?city=El+Dorado+Hills&state=CA&zip=</ref> Growth slowed during the early part of the '90s due to an economic [[recession]] throughout California, but resumed at a staggering pace by the mid 1990s. Businesses, particularly those interested in escaping the high costs of [[Silicon Valley]] began to set up operations in the El Dorado Hills Business Park south of Highway 50.<ref>Sacramento Business Journal, "More Companies Leave Silicon Valley for EDH" September 7, 2001.</ref> In 1995, the Parker Development Company acquired {{convert|3500|acre|km2}} along the eastern boundary of El Dorado Hills to create Serrano, one of the largest master planned communities in Northern California. Serrano was the site of an innovative case of recycled water irrigation on a large scale. http://www.owue.water.ca.gov/recycle/WCN/Green-Grass_WCN1002.pdf
   
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