ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Report

Navigation

ID:1520966
User:67.231.37.26
Article:Jean-Paul Marat
Diff:
m (Reverted edits by 66.90.170.221 (talk) unexplained removal of content (HG))
(Death)
Line 76: Line 76:
   
 
[[Image:Death of Marat by David.jpg|thumb|right|150px|''[[The Death of Marat]]'' by [[Jacques-Louis David]] (1793)]]
 
[[Image:Death of Marat by David.jpg|thumb|right|150px|''[[The Death of Marat]]'' by [[Jacques-Louis David]] (1793)]]
Marat was in his bathtub on 13 July, when a young woman from [[Caen]], [[Charlotte Corday]], appeared at his flat, claiming to have vital information on the activities of the escaped [[Girondins]] who had fled to Normandy. Despite his wife Simonne's protests, Marat asked for her to enter and gave her an audience by his bath, over which a board had been laid to serve as a writing desk. Their interview lasted around fifteen minutes. He asked her what was happening in Caen and she explained, reciting a list of the offending deputies. After he had finished writing out the list, Corday claimed that he told her, "Their heads will fall within a fortnight". A statement which she later changed at her trial to, "Soon I shall have them all guillotined in Paris". This was unlikely since Marat did not have the power to have anyone guillotined.<!-- Why unlikely? He had the "power of the pen" & without ordering their execution, he could plead in favor of it/FW --> At that moment, Corday rose from her chair, drawing out from her corset the five-inch kitchen knife, which she had bought earlier that day, and brought it down hard into Marat’s chest, where it pierced just under his right clavicle, opening the carotid artery, close to the heart. The massive bleeding was fatal within seconds. Slumping backwards, Marat cried out his last words to Simonne, "Aidez-moi, ma chère amie!" ("Help me, my dear friend!") and died.
+
Marat was in his bathtub on 13 July, when a young woman from bitches can kiss this ass cause a motherfucker aint got time for that bullcrap[[Caen]], [[Charlotte Corday]], appeared at his flat, claiming to have vital information on the activities of the escaped [[Girondins]] who had fled to Normandy. Despite his wife Simonne's protests, Marat asked for her to enter and gave her an audience by his bath, over which a board had been laid to serve as a writing desk. Their interview lasted around fifteen minutes. He asked her what was happening in Caen and she explained, reciting a list of the offending deputies. After he had finished writing out the list, Corday claimed that he told her, "Their heads will fall within a fortnight". A statement which she later changed at her trial to, "Soon I shall have them all guillotined in Paris". This was unlikely since Marat did not have the power to have anyone guillotined.<!-- Why unlikely? He had the "power of the pen" & without ordering their execution, he could plead in favor of it/FW --> At that moment, Corday rose from her chair, drawing out from her corset the five-inch kitchen knife, which she had bought earlier that day, and brought it down hard into Marat’s chest, where it pierced just under his right clavicle, opening the carotid artery, close to the heart. The massive bleeding was fatal within seconds. Slumping backwards, Marat cried out his last words to Simonne, "Aidez-moi, ma chère amie!" ("Help me, my dear friend!") and died.
   
 
Corday was a Girondin sympathiser<!-- BRITISH English/FW --> who came from an impoverished royalist family – her brothers were [[émigrés]] who had left to join the exiled royal princes. From her own account, and those of witnesses, it is clear that she had been inspired by Girondin speeches to a hatred of the Montagnards and their excesses, symbolised<!-- BRITISH English/FW --> most powerfully in the character of Marat.<ref>Andress, David, ''The Terror: The Merciless War for Freedom in Revolutionary France'', (New York: SFG Books, 2005), p. 189.</ref> The ''[[Chambers_Book_of_Days|Book of Days]]'' claims the motive was to "avenge the death of her friend Barboroux". Marat's assassination contributed to the mounting suspicion which fed the Terror during which thousands of the Jacobins' adversaries – both royalists and Girondins – were executed on supposed charges of [[treason]]. Charlotte Corday was guillotined on 17 July 1793 for the murder. During her four-day trial, she had testified that she had carried out the assassination alone, saying "''I killed one man to save 100,000.''"
 
Corday was a Girondin sympathiser<!-- BRITISH English/FW --> who came from an impoverished royalist family – her brothers were [[émigrés]] who had left to join the exiled royal princes. From her own account, and those of witnesses, it is clear that she had been inspired by Girondin speeches to a hatred of the Montagnards and their excesses, symbolised<!-- BRITISH English/FW --> most powerfully in the character of Marat.<ref>Andress, David, ''The Terror: The Merciless War for Freedom in Revolutionary France'', (New York: SFG Books, 2005), p. 189.</ref> The ''[[Chambers_Book_of_Days|Book of Days]]'' claims the motive was to "avenge the death of her friend Barboroux". Marat's assassination contributed to the mounting suspicion which fed the Terror during which thousands of the Jacobins' adversaries – both royalists and Girondins – were executed on supposed charges of [[treason]]. Charlotte Corday was guillotined on 17 July 1793 for the murder. During her four-day trial, she had testified that she had carried out the assassination alone, saying "''I killed one man to save 100,000.''"
Reason:ANN scored at 0.971787
Your username:
Reverted:Yes
Comment
(optional):

Note: Comments are completely optional. You do not have to justify your edit.
If this is a false positive, then you're right, and the bot is wrong - you don't need to explain why.