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Article:Blackberry
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Blackberries are [[perennial plant]]s which typically bear [[biennial plant|biennial]] stems ("canes") from the perennial root system.<ref name=uga>[http://www.ugaextension.com/cobb/anr/Documents/BlackberriesandRaspberriesUGA.pdf Gerard Krewer, Marco Fonseca, Phil Brannen, Dan Horton, 2004. Home Garden:Raspberries, Blackberries] Cooperative Extension Service/The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences</ref>
 
Blackberries are [[perennial plant]]s which typically bear [[biennial plant|biennial]] stems ("canes") from the perennial root system.<ref name=uga>[http://www.ugaextension.com/cobb/anr/Documents/BlackberriesandRaspberriesUGA.pdf Gerard Krewer, Marco Fonseca, Phil Brannen, Dan Horton, 2004. Home Garden:Raspberries, Blackberries] Cooperative Extension Service/The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences</ref>
   
In its first year, a new stem, the '''primocane''', grows vigorously to its full length of 3–6 m (in some cases, up to 9 m), arching or trailing along the ground and bearing large [[leaf shape|palmately compound]] [[leaf|leaves]] with five or seven leaflets; it does not produce any flowers. In its second year, the cane becomes a '''floricane''' and the stem does not grow longer, but the lateral buds break to produce flowering laterals (which have smaller leaves with three or five leaflets).<ref name=uga/> First and second year shoots usually have numerous short curved very sharp [[Thorns, spines, and prickles|prickles]] that are often erroneously called thorns. Prickle-free cultivars have been developed. Recently the University of Arkansas has developed primocane fruiting blackberries that grow and flower on first year growth much as the primocane-fruiting (also called fall bearing or everbearing) red [[Raspberry|raspberries]] do.
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IT COMMMES FROM CARPHONWRRRE HOUSE !!! In its first year, a new stem, the '''primocane''', grows vigorously to its full length of 3–6 m (in some cases, up to 9 m), arching or trailing along the ground and bearing large [[leaf shape|palmately compound]] [[leaf|leaves]] with five or seven leaflets; it does not produce any flowers. In its second year, the cane becomes a '''floricane''' and the stem does not grow longer, but the lateral buds break to produce flowering laterals (which have smaller leaves with three or five leaflets).<ref name=uga/> First and second year shoots usually have numerous short curved very sharp [[Thorns, spines, and prickles|prickles]] that are often erroneously called thorns. Prickle-free cultivars have been developed. Recently the University of Arkansas has developed primocane fruiting blackberries that grow and flower on first year growth much as the primocane-fruiting (also called fall bearing or everbearing) red [[Raspberry|raspberries]] do.
   
 
Unmanaged mature plants form a tangle of dense arching stems, the branches rooting from the node tip on many species when they reach the ground. Vigorous and growing rapidly in woods, scrub, hillsides and hedgerows, blackberry shrubs tolerate poor [[soil]]s, readily colonizing wasteland, ditches and vacant lots.<ref name=rhs/><ref name=blamey>Blamey, M. & Grey-Wilson, C. (1989). ''Flora of Britain and Northern Europe''. ISBN 0-340-40170-2.</ref>
 
Unmanaged mature plants form a tangle of dense arching stems, the branches rooting from the node tip on many species when they reach the ground. Vigorous and growing rapidly in woods, scrub, hillsides and hedgerows, blackberry shrubs tolerate poor [[soil]]s, readily colonizing wasteland, ditches and vacant lots.<ref name=rhs/><ref name=blamey>Blamey, M. & Grey-Wilson, C. (1989). ''Flora of Britain and Northern Europe''. ISBN 0-340-40170-2.</ref>
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