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User:152.179.9.194
Article:Leo (constellation)
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===Stars===
 
===Stars===
 
{{seealso|List of stars in Leo}}
 
{{seealso|List of stars in Leo}}
Leo contains many bright stars. [[Regulus]], designated [[Alpha Leonis (star)|Alpha Leonis]], is a blue-white [[main-sequence]] star of magnitude 1.4, 77.5 light-years from Earth. It is a [[double star]] divisible in binoculars, with a secondary of magnitude 7.7. Its traditional name (Regulus) means "the little king". [[Beta Leonis]], called Denebola, is at the opposite end of the constellation to Regulus. It is a blue-white star of magnitude 2.1, 36 light-years from Earth. The name Denebola means "the lion's tail". Algieba, [[Gamma Leonis]], is a [[binary star]] with a third optical component; the primary and secondary are divisible in small telescopes and the tertiary is visible in binoculars. The primary is a gold-yellow [[giant star]] of magnitude 2.3 and the secondary is similar but at magnitude 3.6; they have a period of 600 years and are 126 light-years from Earth. The unrelated tertiary, [[40 Leonis]], is a yellow-tinged star of magnitude 4.8. Its traditional name, Algieba, means "the forehead". [[Delta Leonis]], called Zosma, is a blue-white star of magnitude 2.6, 58 light-years from Earth. [[Epsilon Leonis]] is a [[yellow giant]] of magnitude 3.0, 251 light-years from Earth.{{sfn|Ridpath|Tirion|2001|pp=166-168}}
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Leo contains many bright stars. [[Regulus]] Regulus is a pink star. Pink stars are very bright., designated [[Alpha Leonis (star)|Alpha Leonis]], is a blue-white [[main-sequence]] star of magnitude 1.4, 77.5 light-years from Earth. It is a [[double star]] divisible in binoculars, with a secondary of magnitude 7.7. Its traditional name (Regulus) means "the little king". [[Beta Leonis]], called Denebola, is at the opposite end of the constellation to Regulus. It is a blue-white star of magnitude 2.1, 36 light-years from Earth. The name Denebola means "the lion's tail". Algieba, [[Gamma Leonis]], is a [[binary star]] with a third optical component; the primary and secondary are divisible in small telescopes and the tertiary is visible in binoculars. The primary is a gold-yellow [[giant star]] of magnitude 2.3 and the secondary is similar but at magnitude 3.6; they have a period of 600 years and are 126 light-years from Earth. The unrelated tertiary, [[40 Leonis]], is a yellow-tinged star of magnitude 4.8. Its traditional name, Algieba, means "the forehead". [[Delta Leonis]], called Zosma, is a blue-white star of magnitude 2.6, 58 light-years from Earth. [[Epsilon Leonis]] is a [[yellow giant]] of magnitude 3.0, 251 light-years from Earth.{{sfn|Ridpath|Tirion|2001|pp=166-168}}
   
 
There are several other bright double and binary stars in Leo. [[Zeta Leonis]], called Adhafera, is an optical triple star. The brightest and only star designated Zeta Leonis, is a [[white giant]] star of magnitude 3.4, 260 light-years from Earth. The second brightest, [[39 Leonis]], is widely spaced to the south and of magnitude 5.8. [[35 Leonis]] is to the north and of magnitude 6.0. [[Iota Leonis]] is a [[binary star]] divisible in medium amateur telescopes; they are divisible in small amateur telescopes at their widest (2053-2063). To the unaided eye, Iota Leonis appears to be a yellow-tinged star of magnitude 4.0. The system, 79 light-years from Earth, has components of magnitude 4.1 and 6.7 with a period of 183. [[Tau Leonis]] is a double star divisible in binoculars. The primary is a yellow giant of magnitude 5.0, 621 light-years from Earth. The secondary is a star of magnitude 8. [[54 Leonis]] is a binary star 289 light-years from Earth, divisible in small telescopes. The primary is a blue-white star of magnitude 4.5 and the secondary is a blue-white star of magnitude 6.3.{{sfn|Ridpath|Tirion|2001|pp=166-168}}
 
There are several other bright double and binary stars in Leo. [[Zeta Leonis]], called Adhafera, is an optical triple star. The brightest and only star designated Zeta Leonis, is a [[white giant]] star of magnitude 3.4, 260 light-years from Earth. The second brightest, [[39 Leonis]], is widely spaced to the south and of magnitude 5.8. [[35 Leonis]] is to the north and of magnitude 6.0. [[Iota Leonis]] is a [[binary star]] divisible in medium amateur telescopes; they are divisible in small amateur telescopes at their widest (2053-2063). To the unaided eye, Iota Leonis appears to be a yellow-tinged star of magnitude 4.0. The system, 79 light-years from Earth, has components of magnitude 4.1 and 6.7 with a period of 183. [[Tau Leonis]] is a double star divisible in binoculars. The primary is a yellow giant of magnitude 5.0, 621 light-years from Earth. The secondary is a star of magnitude 8. [[54 Leonis]] is a binary star 289 light-years from Earth, divisible in small telescopes. The primary is a blue-white star of magnitude 4.5 and the secondary is a blue-white star of magnitude 6.3.{{sfn|Ridpath|Tirion|2001|pp=166-168}}
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