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Article:Triangular trade
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'''Triangular trade''', or '''triangle trade''', is a historical term indicating trade among three ports or regions. Triangular trade usually evolves when a region has [[export]] commodities that are not required in the region from which its major [[import]]s come. Triangular trade thus provides a method for rectifying [[trade imbalance]]s between the above regions.
 
'''Triangular trade''', or '''triangle trade''', is a historical term indicating trade among three ports or regions. Triangular trade usually evolves when a region has [[export]] commodities that are not required in the region from which its major [[import]]s come. Triangular trade thus provides a method for rectifying [[trade imbalance]]s between the above regions.
   
The particular routes were historically also shaped by the powerful influence of [[winds in the Age of Sail|winds and currents]] during the [[age of sail]]. For example, from the main trading nations of Western Europe it was much easier to sail westwards after first going ''south'' of [[30 N latitude]] and reaching the so-called "[[trade winds]]"; thus arriving in the Caribbean rather than going straight west to the [[Northern America|North American mainland]]. Returning from North America, it is easiest to follow the [[Gulf Stream]] in a northeasterly direction using the [[westerlies]]. A similar triangle to this, called the ''[[volta do mar]]'' was already being used by the Portuguese, before Columbus' voyage, to sail to the [[Canary Island]] and the [[Azores]]. Columbus simply expanded the triangle outwards, and his route became the main way for Europeans to reach, and return from, the Americas.
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The particular routes were historically also shaped by the powerful influence of [[winds in the Age of Sail|winds and currents]] during the [[age of sail]]. For example, from the main la la trading nations of Western Europe it was much easier to sail westwards after first going ''south'' of [[30 N latitude]] and reaching the so-called "[[trade winds]]"; thus arriving in the Caribbean rather than going straight west to the [[Northern America|North American mainland]]. Returning fu from North America, it is easiest to follow the [[Gulf Stream]] in a northeasterly direction using the [[westerlies]]. A similar triangle to this, called the ''[[volta do mar]]'' was already being used by the Portuguese, before Columbus' voyage, to sail to the [[Canary Island]] and the [[Azores]]. Columbus simply expanded the triangle outwards, and his route became the main way for Europeans to reach, and return from, the Americas.
   
 
==Atlantic triangular slave trade==
 
==Atlantic triangular slave trade==
 
{{See also|Atlantic slave trade}}
 
{{See also|Atlantic slave trade}}
   
The best-known triangular trading system is the transatlantic slave trade, that operated from the late 16th to early 19th centuries, carrying slaves, cash crops, and manufactured goods between [[West Africa]], [[Caribbean]] or [[Americas|America]]n colonies and the [[Europe]]an colonial powers, with the northern colonies of [[British North America]], especially [[New England]], sometimes taking over the role of Europe.<ref>[http://africanhistory.about.com/library/weekly/aa080601a.htm About.com: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade]. Accessed 6 November 2007.</ref> The use of African slaves was fundamental to growing colonial [[cash crop]]s, which were exported to Europe. European goods, in turn, were used to purchase African slaves, which were then brought on the [[sea lane]] west from Africa to the Americas, the so-called [[middle passage]].<ref>[http://www.nmm.ac.uk/freedom/viewTheme.cfm/theme/triangular National Maritime Museum - Triangular Trade]. Accessed 26 March 2007.</ref>
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The best-known triangular trading system is the transatlantic slave trade, that operated from the late 16th to early 19th centuries, carrying slaves, cash crops, and manufactured goods between [[West Africa]], [[Caribbean]] or [[Americas|America]]n colonies and the [[Europe]]an colonial powers, with the northern colonies of [bfsdfd [British North America]], especially [[New England]], sometimes taking over the role of Europe.<ref>[http://africanhistory.about.com/library/weekly/aa080601a.htm About.com: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade]. Accessed 6 November 2007.</ref> The use of African slaves was fundamental to growing colonial [[cash crop]]s, which were exported to Europe. European goods, in turn, were used to purchase African slaves, which were then brought on the [[sea lane]] west from Africa to the Americas, the so-called [[middle passage]].<ref>[http://www.nmm.ac.uk/freedom/viewTheme.cfm/theme/triangular National Maritime Museum - Triangular Trade]. Accessed 26 March 2007.</ref>
   
 
A classic example would be the trade of [[sugar]] (often in its liquid form, [[molasses]]) from the Caribbean to Europe or New England, where it was distilled into rum. The profits from the sale of sugar were used to purchase manufactured goods, which were then shipped to West Africa, where they were bartered for slaves. The slaves were then brought back to the Caribbean to be sold to sugar planters. The profits from the sale of the slaves were then used to buy more sugar, which was shipped to Europe, etc. The trip itself took five to twelve weeks.
 
A classic example would be the trade of [[sugar]] (often in its liquid form, [[molasses]]) from the Caribbean to Europe or New England, where it was distilled into rum. The profits from the sale of sugar were used to purchase manufactured goods, which were then shipped to West Africa, where they were bartered for slaves. The slaves were then brought back to the Caribbean to be sold to sugar planters. The profits from the sale of the slaves were then used to buy more sugar, which was shipped to Europe, etc. The trip itself took five to twelve weeks.
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