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ID:1576864
User:216.248.238.5
Article:George III of the United Kingdom
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m (Reverted edits by 208.68.154.97 (talk) to last revision by ClueBot NG (HG))
(American War of Independence)
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As late as the [[Siege of Charleston]] in 1780, Loyalists could still believe in their eventual victory, as British troops inflicted heavy defeats on the Continental forces at the [[Battle of Camden]] and the [[Battle of Guilford Court House]].<ref>''The Oxford Illustrated History of the British Army'' (1994) p. 129</ref> In late 1781, the news of [[Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis|Lord Cornwallis's]] surrender at the [[Siege of Yorktown]] reached London; Lord North's parliamentary support ebbed away and he resigned the following year. The King drafted an abdication notice, which was never delivered,<ref name=cg/><ref>Brooke, p. 221</ref> finally accepted the defeat in North America, and authorised peace negotiations. The [[Peace of Paris (1783)|Treaties of Paris]], by which Britain recognised the independence of the American states and [[Spanish Florida|returned Florida]] to Spain, were signed in 1782 and 1783.<ref>U.S. Department of State, [http://history.state.gov/milestones/1776-1783/Treaty Treaty of Paris, 1783], retrieved 5 July 2013</ref> When [[John Adams]] was appointed [[United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom|American Minister to London]] in 1785, George had become resigned to the new relationship between his country and the former colonies. He told Adams, "I was the last to consent to the separation; but the separation having been made and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the friendship of the United States as an independent power."<ref>Adams, C.F. (editor) (1850–56), ''The works of John Adams, second president of the United States'', vol. VIII, pp. 255–257, quoted in Ayling, p. 323 and Hibbert, p. 165</ref>
 
As late as the [[Siege of Charleston]] in 1780, Loyalists could still believe in their eventual victory, as British troops inflicted heavy defeats on the Continental forces at the [[Battle of Camden]] and the [[Battle of Guilford Court House]].<ref>''The Oxford Illustrated History of the British Army'' (1994) p. 129</ref> In late 1781, the news of [[Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis|Lord Cornwallis's]] surrender at the [[Siege of Yorktown]] reached London; Lord North's parliamentary support ebbed away and he resigned the following year. The King drafted an abdication notice, which was never delivered,<ref name=cg/><ref>Brooke, p. 221</ref> finally accepted the defeat in North America, and authorised peace negotiations. The [[Peace of Paris (1783)|Treaties of Paris]], by which Britain recognised the independence of the American states and [[Spanish Florida|returned Florida]] to Spain, were signed in 1782 and 1783.<ref>U.S. Department of State, [http://history.state.gov/milestones/1776-1783/Treaty Treaty of Paris, 1783], retrieved 5 July 2013</ref> When [[John Adams]] was appointed [[United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom|American Minister to London]] in 1785, George had become resigned to the new relationship between his country and the former colonies. He told Adams, "I was the last to consent to the separation; but the separation having been made and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the friendship of the United States as an independent power."<ref>Adams, C.F. (editor) (1850–56), ''The works of John Adams, second president of the United States'', vol. VIII, pp. 255–257, quoted in Ayling, p. 323 and Hibbert, p. 165</ref>
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==Constitutional struggle==
 
==Constitutional struggle==
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