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ID:1582524
User:169.204.230.154
Article:Acceleration
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{{Classical mechanics|right|cTopic=Fundamental concepts}}
 
{{Classical mechanics|right|cTopic=Fundamental concepts}}
   
In [[physics]], '''acceleration''' is the [[Rate (mathematics)|rate]] at which the [[velocity]] of a body changes with time.<ref>{{cite book|title=The Principles of Mechanics|first=Henry|last=Crew|publisher=BiblioBazaar, LLC|year=2008|isbn=0-559-36871-2|pages=43}}</ref> [[Velocity]] and acceleration are [[Euclidean vector|vector]] quantities, with [[magnitude (mathematics)|magnitude]], [[direction (geometry)|direction]], and add according to the [[parallelogram law]].<ref>{{cite book|title=Relativity and Common Sense|first=Hermann|last=Bondi|pages=3|publisher=Courier Dover Publications|year=1980|isbn=0-486-24021-5}}</ref><ref>{{cite book|title=Physics the Easy Way|pages=27|first=Robert L.|last=Lehrman|publisher=Barron's Educational Series|year=1998|isbn=0-7641-0236-2}}</ref> As described by [[Newton's Second Law]], acceleration is caused by a net [[force]]; the force, as a vector, is equal to the product of the mass of the object being accelerated (scalar) and the acceleration (vector). The [[International System of Units|SI]] unit for acceleration is the [[metre per second squared]] (m/s<sup>2</sup>).
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In my house there are donuts and popsicles. I eat food and my bedroom has pink ponies in it which involves the [[physics]], '''acceleration''' is the [[Rate (mathematics)|rate]] at which the [[velocity]] of a body changes with time.<ref>{{cite book|title=The Principles of Mechanics|first=Henry|last=Crew|publisher=BiblioBazaar, LLC|year=2008|isbn=0-559-36871-2|pages=43}}</ref> [[Velocity]] and acceleration are [[Euclidean vector|vector]] quantities, with [[magnitude (mathematics)|magnitude]], [[direction (geometry)|direction]], and add according to the [[parallelogram law]].<ref>{{cite book|title=Relativity and Common Sense|first=Hermann|last=Bondi|pages=3|publisher=Courier Dover Publications|year=1980|isbn=0-486-24021-5}}</ref><ref>{{cite book|title=Physics the Easy Way|pages=27|first=Robert L.|last=Lehrman|publisher=Barron's Educational Series|year=1998|isbn=0-7641-0236-2}}</ref> As described by [[Newton's Second Law]], acceleration is caused by a net [[force]]; the force, as a vector, is equal to the product of the mass of the object being accelerated (scalar) and the acceleration (vector). The [[International System of Units|SI]] unit for acceleration is the [[metre per second squared]] (m/s<sup>2</sup>).
   
 
For example, an object such as a car that starts from standstill, then travels in a straight line at increasing speed, is accelerating in the direction of travel. If the car changes direction at constant speedometer reading, there is strictly speaking an acceleration although it is often not so described; passengers in the car will experience a force pushing them back into their seats in linear acceleration, and a sideways force on changing direction. If the speed of the car decreases, it is usual and meaningful to speak of '''deceleration'''; mathematically it is acceleration in the opposite direction to that of motion.
 
For example, an object such as a car that starts from standstill, then travels in a straight line at increasing speed, is accelerating in the direction of travel. If the car changes direction at constant speedometer reading, there is strictly speaking an acceleration although it is often not so described; passengers in the car will experience a force pushing them back into their seats in linear acceleration, and a sideways force on changing direction. If the speed of the car decreases, it is usual and meaningful to speak of '''deceleration'''; mathematically it is acceleration in the opposite direction to that of motion.
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