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Article:Atlantic Puffin
Diff:
(On land: video)
(Hunting)
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Breeding colonies of Atlantic Puffins provide an interesting spectacle for both bird watchers and tourists. Four thousand Puffins nest each year on islands off the coast of Maine and visitors can view them from tour boats which operate during the summer months. There is a Project Puffin Visitor Centre in [[Rockland, Maine|Rockland]] providing information on the birds and their lives, and on the other conservation projects being undertaken by the [[National Audubon Society]] who run the centre.<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.visitmaine.com/attractions/nature/bird_watching_guided/puffins/ |title=Bird watching: Puffins |work=Maine |publisher=Maine Office of Tourism |accessdate=21 August 2013}}</ref> In Iceland, Puffin watching is also an attraction and boat tours are available.<ref>{{cite news |title=Iceland holidays: Volcano walks and puffin spotting (or not) in the Westman Islands |author=Oswell, Paul |url=http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-1371628/Iceland-holidays-Volcano-walks-puffin-spotting-Westman-Islands.html |newspaper=MailOnline |date=11 April 2011 |accessdate=26 August 2013}}</ref>
 
Breeding colonies of Atlantic Puffins provide an interesting spectacle for both bird watchers and tourists. Four thousand Puffins nest each year on islands off the coast of Maine and visitors can view them from tour boats which operate during the summer months. There is a Project Puffin Visitor Centre in [[Rockland, Maine|Rockland]] providing information on the birds and their lives, and on the other conservation projects being undertaken by the [[National Audubon Society]] who run the centre.<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.visitmaine.com/attractions/nature/bird_watching_guided/puffins/ |title=Bird watching: Puffins |work=Maine |publisher=Maine Office of Tourism |accessdate=21 August 2013}}</ref> In Iceland, Puffin watching is also an attraction and boat tours are available.<ref>{{cite news |title=Iceland holidays: Volcano walks and puffin spotting (or not) in the Westman Islands |author=Oswell, Paul |url=http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-1371628/Iceland-holidays-Volcano-walks-puffin-spotting-Westman-Islands.html |newspaper=MailOnline |date=11 April 2011 |accessdate=26 August 2013}}</ref>
   
===Hunting===
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TROLOLOL
{{multiple image
 
| align = right
 
| direction = vertical
 
| header =
 
| width =
 
 
| image1 = Fleygamenn Trongisvágur.jpg
 
| alt1 = Puffin hunting
 
| caption1 = Puffin hunters, [[Faroe Islands]], 1898 or 1899
 
 
| image2 = Stora dimun puffins for kitchen.jpg
 
| alt2 = Puffin carcases
 
| caption2 = On [[Stóra Dímun]], [[Faroese puffin|Puffins are still important food today]].
 
}}
 
Puffins have been hunted by man since time immemorial. Coastal communities and island dwellers with few natural resources at their disposal, made good use of the seafoods that they found on their cliffs and shores. Puffins were caught and eaten fresh, salted in brine or smoked and dried. Their feathers were used in bedding and their eggs were eaten, but not to the same extent as those of some other seabirds, being more difficult to extract from the nest. In most countries, Atlantic Puffins are now protected by legislation, and in the countries where hunting is still permitted, strict laws prevent over-exploitation. They are still caught and eaten in Iceland and the Faroe Islands,<ref>{{cite web |url=http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/709 |title=Atlantic Puffin (''Fratercula arctica'') |last=Lowther |first=Peter E. |last2=Diamond |first2=A. W. |last3= Kress |first3=Stephen W. |last4=Robertson |first4=Gregory J. |last5= Russell |first5=Keith |year=2002|work=The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.)|publisher=Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology |accessdate=13 June 2013 (Subscription required)}}</ref> but there have been calls for an outright ban on hunting them in Iceland because of concern over the dwindling number of birds successfully raising chicks.<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.icenews.is/2011/11/01/outright-puffin-hunting-ban-suggested-in-face-of-population-crisis/ |title=Outright puffin hunting ban suggested in face of population crisis |date=1 November 2011 |work=IceNews |accessdate=29 August 2013}}</ref>
 
 
Traditional means of capture varied across the birds' range and nets and rods were used in various ingenious ways. A typical device used in the Faroes was a "fleyg". This was a long pole with a net on the end laid flat on the ground. A few dead Puffins were strewn around to entice incoming birds to land, and the net was flicked upwards to scoop a bird from the air as it slowed before alighting. Most of the birds caught were sub-adults, and a skilled hunter could gather two or three hundred in a day. Another method of capture, used in [[St Kilda, Scotland|St Kilda]], involved the use of a flexible pole with a noose on the end. This was pushed along the ground towards the intended target, which advanced to inspect the noose as its curiosity overcame its caution. A flick of the wrist would flip the noose over the victim's head and it was promptly killed, before its struggles alarmed other nearby Puffins.<ref name=boag113>Boag & Alexander (1995) pp. 112–113</ref>
 
   
 
===In culture===
 
===In culture===
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