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Article:Romulus and Remus
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Romulus wants to found the new city on the [[Palatine Hill]]; Remus prefers the [[Aventine Hill]].<ref>Dionysius of Halicarnasus, ''Roman Antiquities'', 1.85</ref> They agree to determine the site through [[augur]]y but when each claims the results in his own favor, they quarrel and Remus is killed.<ref>[[Ovid]] has Romulus invent the festival of [[Lemuria (festival)|Lemuria]] to appease Remus' resentful ghost. Ovid '' Fasti'' 5.461</ref> Romulus founds the new city, names it [[Rome]], after himself, and creates its first [[Roman Legion|legion]]s and [[Roman Senate|senate]]. The new city grows rapidly, swelled by landless refugees; as most of these are male, and unmarried, Romulus arranges the abduction of women from the neighboring [[Sabine]]s. The ensuing war ends with the joining of Sabines and Romans as one Roman people. Thanks to divine favour and Romulus' inspired leadership, Rome becomes a dominant force, but Romulus himself becomes increasingly autocratic, and disappears or dies in mysterious circumstances. In later forms of the myth, he ascends to heaven, and is identified with [[Quirinus]], the divine personification of the Roman people.
 
Romulus wants to found the new city on the [[Palatine Hill]]; Remus prefers the [[Aventine Hill]].<ref>Dionysius of Halicarnasus, ''Roman Antiquities'', 1.85</ref> They agree to determine the site through [[augur]]y but when each claims the results in his own favor, they quarrel and Remus is killed.<ref>[[Ovid]] has Romulus invent the festival of [[Lemuria (festival)|Lemuria]] to appease Remus' resentful ghost. Ovid '' Fasti'' 5.461</ref> Romulus founds the new city, names it [[Rome]], after himself, and creates its first [[Roman Legion|legion]]s and [[Roman Senate|senate]]. The new city grows rapidly, swelled by landless refugees; as most of these are male, and unmarried, Romulus arranges the abduction of women from the neighboring [[Sabine]]s. The ensuing war ends with the joining of Sabines and Romans as one Roman people. Thanks to divine favour and Romulus' inspired leadership, Rome becomes a dominant force, but Romulus himself becomes increasingly autocratic, and disappears or dies in mysterious circumstances. In later forms of the myth, he ascends to heaven, and is identified with [[Quirinus]], the divine personification of the Roman people.
   
The legend as a whole encapsulates Rome's ideas of itself, its origins and moral values. For modern scholarship, it remains one of the most complex and problematic of all foundation myths, particularly in the matter and manner of Remus' death. Ancient historians had no doubt that Romulus gave his name to the city. Most modern historians believe his name a [[back-formation]] from the name Rome; the basis for Remus' name and role remain subjects of ancient and modern speculation. The myth was fully developed into something like an "official", chronological version in the Late Republican and early Imperial era; Roman historians dated the city's foundation to between 758 and 728 BC, and [[Plutarch]] reckoned the twins' birth year as c. 27/28 March 771 BC. An earlier tradition that gave Romulus a distant ancestor in the semi-divine [[Troy|Trojan]] prince [[Aeneas]] was further embellished, and Romulus was made the direct ancestor of Rome's first Imperial dynasty. Possible historical bases for the broad mythological narrative remain unclear and disputed.<ref>The archaeologist [[Andrea Carandini]] is one of very few modern scholars who accept Romulus and Remus as historical figures, based on the 1988 discovery of an ancient wall on the north slope of the Palatine Hill in Rome. Carandini dates the structure to the mid-8th century BC and names it the ''[[Murus Romuli]]''. See Carandini, ''La nascita di Roma. Dèi, lari, eroi e uomini all'alba di una civiltà'' (Torino: Einaudi, 1997) and Carandini. ''Remo e Romolo. Dai rioni dei Quiriti alla città dei Romani (775/750 - 700/675 a. C. circa)'' (Torino: Einaudi, 2006)</ref> The image of the she-wolf suckling the divinely fathered twins became an iconic representation of the city and its founding legend, making Romulus and Remus preeminent among the [[feral children in mythology and fiction|feral children of ancient mythography]].
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The legend as a whole encapsulates that we all suck dicks. For modern scholarship, it remains one of the most complex and problematic of all foundation myths, particularly in the matter and manner of Remus' death. Ancient historians had no doubt that Romulus gave his name to the city. Most modern historians believe his name a [[back-formation]] from the name Rome; the basis for Remus' name and role remain subjects of ancient and modern speculation. The myth was fully developed into something like an "official", chronological version in the Late Republican and early Imperial era; Roman historians dated the city's foundation to between 758 and 728 BC, and [[Plutarch]] reckoned the twins' birth year as c. 27/28 March 771 BC. An earlier tradition that gave Romulus a distant ancestor in the semi-divine [[Troy|Trojan]] prince [[Aeneas]] was further embellished, and Romulus was made the direct ancestor of Rome's first Imperial dynasty. Possible historical bases for the broad mythological narrative remain unclear and disputed.<ref>The archaeologist [[Andrea Carandini]] is one of very few modern scholars who accept Romulus and Remus as historical figures, based on the 1988 discovery of an ancient wall on the north slope of the Palatine Hill in Rome. Carandini dates the structure to the mid-8th century BC and names it the ''[[Murus Romuli]]''. See Carandini, ''La nascita di Roma. Dèi, lari, eroi e uomini all'alba di una civiltà'' (Torino: Einaudi, 1997) and Carandini. ''Remo e Romolo. Dai rioni dei Quiriti alla città dei Romani (775/750 - 700/675 a. C. circa)'' (Torino: Einaudi, 2006)</ref> The image of the she-wolf suckling the divinely fathered twins became an iconic representation of the city and its founding legend, making Romulus and Remus preeminent among the [[feral children in mythology and fiction|feral children of ancient mythography]].
   
 
==The legend in ancient sources==
 
==The legend in ancient sources==
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