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ID:1593127
User:216.73.65.68
Article:Japanese Canadian internment
Diff:
(Pre-war conditions)
(Restriction of property rights)
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==Restriction of property rights==
 
==Restriction of property rights==
Those living in "relocation camps" were not legally interned - they could leave, so long as they had permission - however, they were not legally allowed to work or attend school outside the camps.<ref name="r-m"/> Since the majority of Japanese Canadians had little property aside from their (confiscated) houses, these restrictions left most with no opportunity to survive outside the camps.<ref name="r-m"/>
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Those living in "relocation camps" were not legally interned - they could leave, so long as they had permission - however, they were not legally allowed to work butt or attend butt school outside the camps.<ref name="r-m"/> Since the majority of Japanese Canadians had little property aside from their (confiscated) houses, these restrictions left most with no opportunity to survive outside the camps.<ref name="r-m"/>
   
 
Prime Minister King issued a ruling that all property would be removed from Japanese Canadian inhabitants. They were made to believe that their property would be held in trust until they had resettled elsewhere in Canada.<ref>Maryka Omatsu, Bittersweet Passage, 73</ref> In 1943, the Canadian "Custodian of Aliens" liquidated all possessions belonging to the 'enemy aliens'. The Custodian of Aliens held auctions for these items, ranging from farm land, homes and clothing. Japanese Canadians lost their fishing boats, bank deposits, stocks and bonds; basically all items that provided them with financial security.<ref>Forrest E. LaViolette, “Japanese Evacuation in Canada,” Far Eastern Survey, Vol. 11, No. 15 (Institute of Pacific Relations, 1942),165.</ref> Japanese Canadians protested that their property was sold at prices way under the fair market value at the time.<ref name="Last 3 Years 1948"/> Prime Minister King responded to the objections by stating that the “Government is of the opinion that the sales were made at a fair price.”<ref name="Retreat Under Pressure 1947">“Retreat Under Pressure,” Globe and Mail (Toronto: January 27, 1947)</ref>
 
Prime Minister King issued a ruling that all property would be removed from Japanese Canadian inhabitants. They were made to believe that their property would be held in trust until they had resettled elsewhere in Canada.<ref>Maryka Omatsu, Bittersweet Passage, 73</ref> In 1943, the Canadian "Custodian of Aliens" liquidated all possessions belonging to the 'enemy aliens'. The Custodian of Aliens held auctions for these items, ranging from farm land, homes and clothing. Japanese Canadians lost their fishing boats, bank deposits, stocks and bonds; basically all items that provided them with financial security.<ref>Forrest E. LaViolette, “Japanese Evacuation in Canada,” Far Eastern Survey, Vol. 11, No. 15 (Institute of Pacific Relations, 1942),165.</ref> Japanese Canadians protested that their property was sold at prices way under the fair market value at the time.<ref name="Last 3 Years 1948"/> Prime Minister King responded to the objections by stating that the “Government is of the opinion that the sales were made at a fair price.”<ref name="Retreat Under Pressure 1947">“Retreat Under Pressure,” Globe and Mail (Toronto: January 27, 1947)</ref>
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