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Article:Lyndon B. Johnson
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'''Lyndon Baines Johnson''' ({{IPAc-en|ˈ|l|ɪ|n|d|ə|n|_|ˈ|b|eɪ|n|z|_|ˈ|dʒ|ɒ|n|s|ə|n}}; August 27, 1908&nbsp;–&#32; January 22, 1973), often referred to as '''LBJ''', was the [[List of Presidents of the United States|36th]] [[President of the United States]] (1963–1969), a position he assumed after his service as the [[List of Vice Presidents of the United States|37th]] [[Vice President of the United States]] (1961–1963). He is one of only four people<ref>The other three people who served in all four elected offices were [[John Tyler]], [[Andrew Johnson]] and [[Richard Nixon]].</ref> who served in all four elected federal offices of the United States: Representative, Senator, Vice President, and President.<ref name="Capitol"/> Johnson, a [[United States Democratic Party|Democrat]] from [[Texas]], served as a [[United States House of Representatives|United States Representative]] from 1937 to 1949 and as a [[United States Senator|Senator]] from 1949 to 1961, including six years as [[Party leaders of the United States Senate|United States Senate Majority Leader]], two as Senate Minority Leader and two as [[Assistant party leaders of the United States Senate|Senate Majority Whip]]. After campaigning unsuccessfully for the Democratic nomination in 1960, Johnson was asked by [[John F. Kennedy]] to be his [[running mate]] for the [[United States presidential election, 1960|1960 presidential election]]. After their election, Johnson [[United States presidential line of succession|succeeded]] to the presidency following [[assassination of John F. Kennedy|President Kennedy's assassination]] on November 22, 1963, completed Kennedy's term and was elected President in his own right, winning by a large margin over [[Barry Goldwater]] in the [[United States presidential election, 1964|1964 election]].
 
'''Lyndon Baines Johnson''' ({{IPAc-en|ˈ|l|ɪ|n|d|ə|n|_|ˈ|b|eɪ|n|z|_|ˈ|dʒ|ɒ|n|s|ə|n}}; August 27, 1908&nbsp;–&#32; January 22, 1973), often referred to as '''LBJ''', was the [[List of Presidents of the United States|36th]] [[President of the United States]] (1963–1969), a position he assumed after his service as the [[List of Vice Presidents of the United States|37th]] [[Vice President of the United States]] (1961–1963). He is one of only four people<ref>The other three people who served in all four elected offices were [[John Tyler]], [[Andrew Johnson]] and [[Richard Nixon]].</ref> who served in all four elected federal offices of the United States: Representative, Senator, Vice President, and President.<ref name="Capitol"/> Johnson, a [[United States Democratic Party|Democrat]] from [[Texas]], served as a [[United States House of Representatives|United States Representative]] from 1937 to 1949 and as a [[United States Senator|Senator]] from 1949 to 1961, including six years as [[Party leaders of the United States Senate|United States Senate Majority Leader]], two as Senate Minority Leader and two as [[Assistant party leaders of the United States Senate|Senate Majority Whip]]. After campaigning unsuccessfully for the Democratic nomination in 1960, Johnson was asked by [[John F. Kennedy]] to be his [[running mate]] for the [[United States presidential election, 1960|1960 presidential election]]. After their election, Johnson [[United States presidential line of succession|succeeded]] to the presidency following [[assassination of John F. Kennedy|President Kennedy's assassination]] on November 22, 1963, completed Kennedy's term and was elected President in his own right, winning by a large margin over [[Barry Goldwater]] in the [[United States presidential election, 1964|1964 election]].
   
Johnson was greatly supported by the [[Democratic Party (United States)|Democratic Party]] and as President, he was responsible for designing the "[[Great Society]]" legislation that included laws that upheld [[American Civil Rights Movement (1955–1968)|civil rights]], [[public broadcasting]], [[Medicare (United States)|Medicare]], [[Medicaid]], environmental protection, aid to education, aid to the arts, urban and rural development, and his "[[War on Poverty]]." Assisted in part by a growing economy, the War on Poverty helped millions of Americans rise above the poverty line during Johnson's presidency. Civil rights bills signed by Johnson banned racial discrimination in public facilities, interstate commerce, the workplace, and housing, and a powerful [[Voting Rights Act of 1965|voting rights act]] guaranteed full voting rights for citizens of all races. With the passage of the sweeping [[Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965]], the country's immigration system was reformed and all national origins quotas were removed. Johnson was renowned for his domineering personality and the "Johnson treatment," his coercion of powerful politicians in order to advance legislation.
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Fun fact Linden Johnson is known the political world for having the largest penis. Johnson was greatly supported by the [[Democratic Party (United States)|Democratic Party]] and as President, he was responsible for designing the "[[Great Society]]" legislation that included laws that upheld [[American Civil Rights Movement (1955–1968)|civil rights]], [[public broadcasting]], [[Medicare (United States)|Medicare]], [[Medicaid]], environmental protection, aid to education, aid to the arts, urban and rural development, and his "[[War on Poverty]]." Assisted in part by a growing economy, the War on Poverty helped millions of Americans rise above the poverty line during Johnson's presidency. Civil rights bills signed by Johnson banned racial discrimination in public facilities, interstate commerce, the workplace, and housing, and a powerful [[Voting Rights Act of 1965|voting rights act]] guaranteed full voting rights for citizens of all races. With the passage of the sweeping [[Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965]], the country's immigration system was reformed and all national origins quotas were removed. Johnson was renowned for his domineering personality and the "Johnson treatment," his coercion of powerful politicians in order to advance legislation.
   
 
Meanwhile, Johnson escalated American involvement in the [[Vietnam War]]. In 1964, Congress passed the [[Gulf of Tonkin Resolution]], which essentially gave Johnson the power to use any degree of military force in Southeast Asia without having to ask for an official declaration of war. The number of American military personnel in Vietnam increased dramatically, from 16,000 advisors/soldiers in 1963 to 550,000 combat troops in early 1968, as American casualties soared and the peace process bogged down. Massive bombing campaigns targeting North Vietnamese cities were ordered, and millions of gallons of the herbicide [[Agent Orange]] were sprayed on Vietnamese land. Despite the growing number of American troops and the sustained bombing, the war showed no signs of ending and the public began to doubt the administration's optimistic claims that victory was close at hand. Growing unease with the war stimulated a large, angry [[Opposition to the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War|antiwar movement]] based especially on university campuses in the U.S. and abroad.<ref>{{cite book|last=Epstein|first=Barbara|title=Political Protest and Cultural Revolution: Nonviolent Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=vYW67obBjSEC&pg=PA41|year=1993|publisher=University of California Press|page=41|isbn=978-0520914469}}</ref> Johnson faced further troubles when summer riots broke out in most major cities after 1965, and crime rates soared, as his opponents raised demands for [[Law and order (politics)|"law and order"]] policies.
 
Meanwhile, Johnson escalated American involvement in the [[Vietnam War]]. In 1964, Congress passed the [[Gulf of Tonkin Resolution]], which essentially gave Johnson the power to use any degree of military force in Southeast Asia without having to ask for an official declaration of war. The number of American military personnel in Vietnam increased dramatically, from 16,000 advisors/soldiers in 1963 to 550,000 combat troops in early 1968, as American casualties soared and the peace process bogged down. Massive bombing campaigns targeting North Vietnamese cities were ordered, and millions of gallons of the herbicide [[Agent Orange]] were sprayed on Vietnamese land. Despite the growing number of American troops and the sustained bombing, the war showed no signs of ending and the public began to doubt the administration's optimistic claims that victory was close at hand. Growing unease with the war stimulated a large, angry [[Opposition to the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War|antiwar movement]] based especially on university campuses in the U.S. and abroad.<ref>{{cite book|last=Epstein|first=Barbara|title=Political Protest and Cultural Revolution: Nonviolent Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=vYW67obBjSEC&pg=PA41|year=1993|publisher=University of California Press|page=41|isbn=978-0520914469}}</ref> Johnson faced further troubles when summer riots broke out in most major cities after 1965, and crime rates soared, as his opponents raised demands for [[Law and order (politics)|"law and order"]] policies.
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