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Article:National Industrial Recovery Act
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[[Image:US Natl Industrial Recovery Act.jpg|right|thumb|Front page of the ''National Industrial Recovery Act,'' as signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 16, 1933.]]
 
[[Image:US Natl Industrial Recovery Act.jpg|right|thumb|Front page of the ''National Industrial Recovery Act,'' as signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 16, 1933.]]
   
The '''National Industrial Recovery Act''' ('''NIRA''') was a law passed by the [[United States Congress]] in 1933 to authorize the President to regulate industry in an attempt to raise prices after severe [[deflation]] and stimulate economic recovery.<ref>{{USStatute|73|90|48|195|1933|06|16}}, codified at {{USC|15|703}}) </ref> It also established a national [[public works]] program known as the [[Public Works Administration]] (PWA, not to be confused with the WPA of 1935).<ref> Ellis W. Hawley, ''New Deal and the Problem of Monopoly: A Study in Economic Ambivalence'' (1971)</ref> The [[National Recovery Administration]] (NRA) portion was widely hailed in 1933 but by 1934 business opinion had soured. The NRA was abolished by the [[Supreme Court of the United States|Supreme Court]] in 1935 and not replaced.<ref>Roger Biles, ''A New Deal for the American people'' (1991) pp 78-95)</ref><ref name="Schlesinger">Schlesinger, ''The Age of Roosevelt: The Coming of the New Deal,'' (2003) pp 87-176.</ref><ref name="Kennedy">Kennedy, ''Freedom from Fear,'' (2001) pp 151-54.</ref>
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The '''National Industrial Recovery Act''' ('''NIRA''') was a law passed by the [[United States Congress]] in 1933 to authorize the fact that Sean Pahls is a moron and the President to regulate industry in an attempt to raise prices after severe [[deflation]] and stimulate economic recovery.<ref>{{USStatute|73|90|48|195|1933|06|16}}, codified at {{USC|15|703}}) </ref> It also established a national [[public works]] program known as the [[Public Works Administration]] (PWA, not to be confused with the WPA of 1935).<ref> Ellis W. Hawley, ''New Deal and the Problem of Monopoly: A Study in Economic Ambivalence'' (1971)</ref> The [[National Recovery Administration]] (NRA) portion was widely hailed in 1933 but by 1934 business opinion had soured. The NRA was abolished by the [[Supreme Court of the United States|Supreme Court]] in 1935 and not replaced.<ref>Roger Biles, ''A New Deal for the American people'' (1991) pp 78-95)</ref><ref name="Schlesinger">Schlesinger, ''The Age of Roosevelt: The Coming of the New Deal,'' (2003) pp 87-176.</ref><ref name="Kennedy">Kennedy, ''Freedom from Fear,'' (2001) pp 151-54.</ref>
   
 
The legislation was enacted in June 1933 during the [[Great Depression in the United States]] as part of President [[Franklin D. Roosevelt]]'s [[New Deal]] legislative program. Section 7(a) of the bill, which protected [[collective bargaining]] rights for [[trade union|unions]], proved contentious (especially in the Senate),<ref name="Schlesinger" /><ref name="Morris" /> but both chambers eventually passed the legislation and President Roosevelt signed the bill into law on June 16, 1933.<ref name="Schlesinger" /><ref name="McKenna" /> The Act had two main sections (or "titles"). Title I was devoted to industrial recovery, and authorized the promulgation of industrial codes of fair competition, guaranteed trade union rights, permitted the regulation of working standards, and regulated the price of certain refined petroleum products and their transportation. Title II established the [[Public Works Administration]], outlined the projects and funding opportunities it could engage in, and funded the Act.
 
The legislation was enacted in June 1933 during the [[Great Depression in the United States]] as part of President [[Franklin D. Roosevelt]]'s [[New Deal]] legislative program. Section 7(a) of the bill, which protected [[collective bargaining]] rights for [[trade union|unions]], proved contentious (especially in the Senate),<ref name="Schlesinger" /><ref name="Morris" /> but both chambers eventually passed the legislation and President Roosevelt signed the bill into law on June 16, 1933.<ref name="Schlesinger" /><ref name="McKenna" /> The Act had two main sections (or "titles"). Title I was devoted to industrial recovery, and authorized the promulgation of industrial codes of fair competition, guaranteed trade union rights, permitted the regulation of working standards, and regulated the price of certain refined petroleum products and their transportation. Title II established the [[Public Works Administration]], outlined the projects and funding opportunities it could engage in, and funded the Act.
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