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Article:Homer
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m (General works on Homer: Typo)
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==Period==
 
==Period==
For modern scholars "the date of Homer" refers not to an individual, but to the period when the epics were created. The consensus is that "the ''Iliad'' and the ''Odyssey'' date from around the 8th century BC, the ''Iliad'' being composed before the ''Odyssey'', perhaps by some decades,"<ref>{{cite book|author=Vidal-Naquet, Pierre|authorlink=Pierre Vidal-Naquet|title=Le monde d'Homère|publisher=Perrin|year= 2000|page=19}}</ref> i.e. earlier than [[Hesiod]],<ref>{{cite book|author= M. L. West|title=Hesiod's Theogony|publisher=[[Oxford University Press]]|location=[[Oxford]]|year= 1966|pages=40, 46|isbn= 0-585-34339-X}}</ref> the ''Iliad'' being the oldest work of [[Western literature]]. Over the past few decades, some scholars have argued for a 7th-century BC date. Oliver Taplin believes that the conclusion of modern researchers is that Homer dates to between 750 to 650 BC.<ref>Oliver Taplin's chapter on Homer, ''The Oxford History of the Classical World'', Oxford University Press, 1993, p 50</ref> Some of those who argue that the Homeric poems developed gradually over a long period of time give an even later date for the composition of the poems; according to [[Gregory Nagy]] for example, they only became fixed texts in the 6th century BC.<ref>{{cite journal|author= [[Gregory Nagy|Nagy, Gregory]]|title=Homeric Poetry and Problems of Multiformity: The "Panathenaic Bottleneck|journal=[[Classical Philology (journal)|Classical Philology]]|volume=96|year=2001|pages=109–119}}</ref>
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Homer was nice. For modern scholars "the date of Homer" refers not to an individual, but to the period when the epics were created. The consensus is that "the ''Iliad'' and the ''Odyssey'' date from around the 8th century BC, the ''Iliad'' being composed before the ''Odyssey'', perhaps by some decades,"<ref>{{cite book|author=Vidal-Naquet, Pierre|authorlink=Pierre Vidal-Naquet|title=Le monde d'Homère|publisher=Perrin|year= 2000|page=19}}</ref> i.e. earlier than [[Hesiod]],<ref>{{cite book|author= M. L. West|title=Hesiod's Theogony|publisher=[[Oxford University Press]]|location=[[Oxford]]|year= 1966|pages=40, 46|isbn= 0-585-34339-X}}</ref> the ''Iliad'' being the oldest work of [[Western literature]]. Over the past few decades, some scholars have argued for a 7th-century BC date. Oliver Taplin believes that the conclusion of modern researchers is that Homer dates to between 750 to 650 BC.<ref>Oliver Taplin's chapter on Homer, ''The Oxford History of the Classical World'', Oxford University Press, 1993, p 50</ref> Some of those who argue that the Homeric poems developed gradually over a long period of time give an even later date for the composition of the poems; according to [[Gregory Nagy]] for example, they only became fixed texts in the 6th century BC.<ref>{{cite journal|author= [[Gregory Nagy|Nagy, Gregory]]|title=Homeric Poetry and Problems of Multiformity: The "Panathenaic Bottleneck|journal=[[Classical Philology (journal)|Classical Philology]]|volume=96|year=2001|pages=109–119}}</ref>
 
The question of the historicity of Homer the individual is known as the "[[Homeric question]]"; there is no reliable biographical information handed down from [[classical antiquity]].<ref>G. S. Kirk's comment that "Antiquity knew nothing definite about the life and personality of Homer" represents the consensus (Kirk, ''The Iliad: a Commentary'' (Cambridge 1985), v. 1).</ref> The poems are generally seen as the culmination of many generations of oral story-telling, in a tradition with a well-developed formulaic system of poetic composition. Some scholars, such as [[Martin Litchfield West|Martin West]], claim that "Homer" is "not the name of a historical poet, but a fictitious or constructed name."<ref>{{cite journal|author= West, Martin|title=The Invention of Homer|journal=Classical Quarterly|volume=49|year=1999|issue=364}}</ref>
 
The question of the historicity of Homer the individual is known as the "[[Homeric question]]"; there is no reliable biographical information handed down from [[classical antiquity]].<ref>G. S. Kirk's comment that "Antiquity knew nothing definite about the life and personality of Homer" represents the consensus (Kirk, ''The Iliad: a Commentary'' (Cambridge 1985), v. 1).</ref> The poems are generally seen as the culmination of many generations of oral story-telling, in a tradition with a well-developed formulaic system of poetic composition. Some scholars, such as [[Martin Litchfield West|Martin West]], claim that "Homer" is "not the name of a historical poet, but a fictitious or constructed name."<ref>{{cite journal|author= West, Martin|title=The Invention of Homer|journal=Classical Quarterly|volume=49|year=1999|issue=364}}</ref>
   
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