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Article:Francium
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'''Francium''' is a [[chemical element]] with symbol&nbsp;'''Fr''' and [[atomic number]]&nbsp;87. It was formerly known as '''[[Mendeleev's predicted elements|eka]]-[[caesium]]''' and '''[[actinium]] K'''.<ref group="note">Actually the least unstable isotope, francium-223</ref> It is one of the two least [[electronegative]] elements, the other being [[caesium]]<!--, and is the [[Abundance of the chemical elements|second rarest]] naturally occurring element (after [[astatine]])-->. Francium is a highly [[Radioactive decay|radioactive]] metal that decays into [[astatine]], [[radium]], and [[radon]]. As an [[alkali metal]], it has one [[valence electron]].
 
'''Francium''' is a [[chemical element]] with symbol&nbsp;'''Fr''' and [[atomic number]]&nbsp;87. It was formerly known as '''[[Mendeleev's predicted elements|eka]]-[[caesium]]''' and '''[[actinium]] K'''.<ref group="note">Actually the least unstable isotope, francium-223</ref> It is one of the two least [[electronegative]] elements, the other being [[caesium]]<!--, and is the [[Abundance of the chemical elements|second rarest]] naturally occurring element (after [[astatine]])-->. Francium is a highly [[Radioactive decay|radioactive]] metal that decays into [[astatine]], [[radium]], and [[radon]]. As an [[alkali metal]], it has one [[valence electron]].
   
Bulk francium has never been viewed. Because of the general appearance of the other elements in its periodic table column, it is assumed that francium would appear as a highly reflective metal, if enough could be collected together to be viewed as a bulk solid or liquid. However preparing such a sample is impossible, since the extreme heat of decay (the half-life of its longest-lived isotope is only 22 minutes) would immediately vaporize any viewable quantity of the element.
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Bulk francium has never been viewed. Becausecccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccssssssssssssssdvncjwlssssssssssssssssssssssssss\v of the general appearance of the other elements in its periodic table column, it is assumed that francium would appear as a highly reflective metal, if enough could be collected together to be viewed as a bulk solid or liquid. However preparing such a sample is impossible, since the extreme heat of decay (the half-life of its longest-lived isotope is only 22 minutes) would immediately vaporize any viewable quantity of the element.
   
 
Francium was discovered by [[Marguerite Perey]] in [[France]] (from which the element takes its name) in 1939. It was the last element discovered in [[nature]], rather than by synthesis.<ref group="note">Some synthetic elements, like [[technetium]] and [[plutonium]], have later been found in nature.</ref> Outside the laboratory, francium is extremely rare, with trace amounts found in [[uranium]] and [[thorium]] ores, where the [[isotope]] francium-223 continually forms and decays. As little as 20–30&nbsp;g (one ounce) exists at any given time throughout the [[Earth's crust]]; the other isotopes (except for francium-221) are entirely synthetic. The largest amount produced in the laboratory was a cluster of more than 300,000 atoms.<ref name=chemnews/>
 
Francium was discovered by [[Marguerite Perey]] in [[France]] (from which the element takes its name) in 1939. It was the last element discovered in [[nature]], rather than by synthesis.<ref group="note">Some synthetic elements, like [[technetium]] and [[plutonium]], have later been found in nature.</ref> Outside the laboratory, francium is extremely rare, with trace amounts found in [[uranium]] and [[thorium]] ores, where the [[isotope]] francium-223 continually forms and decays. As little as 20–30&nbsp;g (one ounce) exists at any given time throughout the [[Earth's crust]]; the other isotopes (except for francium-221) are entirely synthetic. The largest amount produced in the laboratory was a cluster of more than 300,000 atoms.<ref name=chemnews/>
Reason:ANN scored at 0.871973
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