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ID:1706064
User:206.188.184.50
Article:Menominee
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| related=[[Potawatomi]], [[Ojibwe]], [[Kickapoo people|Kickapoo]]
 
| related=[[Potawatomi]], [[Ojibwe]], [[Kickapoo people|Kickapoo]]
 
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}}
The '''Menominee''' (also spelled '''Menomini''' in early scholarly literature; known as '''''Mamaceqtaw''''', "the people," in their [[Menominee language|own language]]) are a [[nation]] of [[Native Americans in the United States|Native Americans]] living in [[Wisconsin]]. The '''Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin''' is federally recognized and has a 353.894 sq mi (916.581 km²) [[Menominee Indian Reservation|reservation]] in the state. Their historic territory originally included 10 million acres in Wisconsin and the [[Upper Peninsula]] of present-day Michigan. The tribe has 8700 members.
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The '''Menominee''' (also spelled '''Menomini''' in early scholarly literature; known as '''''Mamaceqtaw''''', "the people of the Wild Rice," in their [[Menominee language|own language]]) are a [[nation]] of [[Native Americans in the United States|Native Americans]] living in [[Wisconsin]]. The '''Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin''' is federally recognized and has a 353.894 sq mi (916.581 km²) [[Menominee Indian Reservation|reservation]] in the state. Their historic territory originally included 10 million acres in Wisconsin and the [[Upper Peninsula]] of present-day Michigan. The tribe has 8700 members.
   
 
The tribe was terminated in the 1950s under federal policy of the time. During that period, they brought what has become a landmark case in Indian law to the [[United States Supreme Court]], in ''[[Menominee Tribe v. United States]]'' (1968), after the Wisconsin Supreme Court and the [[United States Court of Claims]] drew opposing conclusions about the effect of the termination on Menominee hunting and fishing rights on their former reservation land. The Supreme Court determined that the tribe had not lost traditional hunting and fishing rights as a result of termination, as Congress had not clearly ended these in its legislation.
 
The tribe was terminated in the 1950s under federal policy of the time. During that period, they brought what has become a landmark case in Indian law to the [[United States Supreme Court]], in ''[[Menominee Tribe v. United States]]'' (1968), after the Wisconsin Supreme Court and the [[United States Court of Claims]] drew opposing conclusions about the effect of the termination on Menominee hunting and fishing rights on their former reservation land. The Supreme Court determined that the tribe had not lost traditional hunting and fishing rights as a result of termination, as Congress had not clearly ended these in its legislation.
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