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Article:Adam Smith
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'''Adam Smith''' (5 June 1723 [[Old Style|OS]]<small> (16 June 1723 [[New Style|NS]])</small> – 17 July 1790) was a Scottish [[Ethics|moral philosopher]] and a pioneer of [[political economy]]. One of the key figures of the [[Scottish Enlightenment]],<ref>{{cite web|title=Great Thinkers of the Scottish Enlightenment|url=http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/scottishhistory/enlightenment/features_enlightenment_enlightenment.shtml}}</ref> Smith is best known for two classic works: ''[[The Theory of Moral Sentiments]]'' (1759), and ''[[The Wealth of Nations|An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations]]'' (1776). The latter, usually abbreviated as ''The Wealth of Nations'', is considered his ''[[magnum opus]]'' and the first modern work of [[economics]]. Smith is cited as the "father of [[modern economics]]" and is still among the most influential thinkers in the field of economics today.<ref>Davis, William L, Bob Figgins, David Hedengren, and Daniel B. Klein. "Economic Professors' Favorite Economic Thinkers, Journals, and Blogs," Econ Journal Watch 8(2): 126–146, May 2011.[http://econjwatch.org/articles/economics-professors-favorite-economic-thinkers-journals-and-blogs-along-with-party-and-policy-views]</ref>
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'''Adam Smith''' (5 June 1723 [[Old Style|OS]]<small> (16 June 1723 [[New Style|NS]])</small> – 17 July 1790) was a Scottish [[Ethics|moral philosopher]] and a pioneer of [[political economy]]. One of the key figures of the [[Scottish Enlightenment]],<ref>{{cite web|title=Great Thinkers of the Scottish Enlightenment|url=http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/scottishhistory/enlightenment/features_enlightenment_enlightenment.shtml}}</ref> Smith is best known for two classic works: ''[[The Theory of Moral Sentiments]]'' (1759), and ''[[The Wealth of Nations|An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations]]'' (1776). The latter, usually abbreviated as ''The Wealth of Nations'', is considered his ''[[magnum opus]]'' and the first modern work of [[economics]]. Smith is cited as the "father of [[modern economics]]" and is still among the most influential thinkers in the field of economics today.<ref>Davis, William L, Bob Figgins, David Hedengren, and Daniel B. Klein. "Economic Professors' Favorite Economic Thinkers, Journals, and Blogs," Econ Journal Watch 8(2): 126–146, May 2011.[http://econjwatch.org/articles/economics-professors-favorite-economic-thinkers-journals-and-blogs-along-with-party-and-policy-views]</ref> HI KJ
   
 
Smith studied [[social philosophy]] at the [[University of Glasgow]] and at [[Balliol College, Oxford]], where he was one of the first students to benefit from scholarships set up by fellow Scot, John Snell. After graduating, he delivered a successful series of public lectures at the [[University of Edinburgh]], leading him to collaborate with [[David Hume]] during the [[Scottish Enlightenment]]. Smith obtained a professorship at Glasgow teaching moral philosophy, and during this time he wrote and published ''The Theory of Moral Sentiments''. In his later life, he took a tutoring position that allowed him to travel throughout Europe, where he met other intellectual leaders of his day. Smith laid the foundations of classical [[free market]] economic theory. ''The Wealth of Nations'' was a precursor to the modern academic discipline of economics. In this and other works, he expounded upon how rational self-interest and competition can lead to economic prosperity. Smith was controversial in his own day and his general approach and writing style were often satirized by [[Tories (British political party)|Tory]] writers in the moralizing tradition of [[William Hogarth]] and [[Jonathan Swift]]. In 2005, ''The Wealth of Nations'' was named among the 100 Best Scottish Books of all time.<ref name="100 Best Scottish Books, Adam Smith">[http://www.list.co.uk/articles/100-best-scottish-books/adam-smith/ 100 Best Scottish Books, Adam Smith] Retrieved 31 January 2012</ref> Former UK Prime Minister [[Margaret Thatcher]], it is said, used to carry a copy of the book in her handbag.<ref>David Smith (2010) [http://books.google.com/books?id=JJIiMbgzJ6gC&pg=PA43&dq=margaret+thatcher+carried+wealth+of+nations&hl=en&sa=X&ei=a1snT-rMHcXW8gPKh4GsAw&ved=0CFEQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=margaret%20thatcher%20carried%20wealth%20of%20nations&f=false Free Lunch: Easily Digestible Economics] p.43. Profile Books 2010</ref>
 
Smith studied [[social philosophy]] at the [[University of Glasgow]] and at [[Balliol College, Oxford]], where he was one of the first students to benefit from scholarships set up by fellow Scot, John Snell. After graduating, he delivered a successful series of public lectures at the [[University of Edinburgh]], leading him to collaborate with [[David Hume]] during the [[Scottish Enlightenment]]. Smith obtained a professorship at Glasgow teaching moral philosophy, and during this time he wrote and published ''The Theory of Moral Sentiments''. In his later life, he took a tutoring position that allowed him to travel throughout Europe, where he met other intellectual leaders of his day. Smith laid the foundations of classical [[free market]] economic theory. ''The Wealth of Nations'' was a precursor to the modern academic discipline of economics. In this and other works, he expounded upon how rational self-interest and competition can lead to economic prosperity. Smith was controversial in his own day and his general approach and writing style were often satirized by [[Tories (British political party)|Tory]] writers in the moralizing tradition of [[William Hogarth]] and [[Jonathan Swift]]. In 2005, ''The Wealth of Nations'' was named among the 100 Best Scottish Books of all time.<ref name="100 Best Scottish Books, Adam Smith">[http://www.list.co.uk/articles/100-best-scottish-books/adam-smith/ 100 Best Scottish Books, Adam Smith] Retrieved 31 January 2012</ref> Former UK Prime Minister [[Margaret Thatcher]], it is said, used to carry a copy of the book in her handbag.<ref>David Smith (2010) [http://books.google.com/books?id=JJIiMbgzJ6gC&pg=PA43&dq=margaret+thatcher+carried+wealth+of+nations&hl=en&sa=X&ei=a1snT-rMHcXW8gPKh4GsAw&ved=0CFEQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=margaret%20thatcher%20carried%20wealth%20of%20nations&f=false Free Lunch: Easily Digestible Economics] p.43. Profile Books 2010</ref>
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