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ID:1717779
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Article:Gojko Šušak
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==Early life==
 
==Early life==
Gojko Šušak was born on 16 March 1945 in [[Široki Brijeg]], in the Croat-dominated part of the [[Herzegovina]] region in present-day [[Bosnia and Herzegovina]]. He was the sixth child of Ante and Stana Šušak. According to some accounts, his father and brother, who were both World War II [[Ustaše]] officers, disappeared two months after his birth. Both were allegedly last seen in [[Zagreb]] on the day that the [[Yugoslav Partisans]] entered the city. According to the Croatian [[Ministry of Defence (Croatia)|Ministry of Defence]], Šušak's family home was torched by the [[Yugoslav Partisans]] in an act of retribution following the war - an event that some Croatian journalists question ever happened.<ref>{{cite book| last = Hockenos| first = Paul| year = 2003| title = Homeland Calling: Exile Patriotism and the Balkan Wars| publisher = Cornell University Press| location = [[Ithaca, New York]]| isbn = 978-0-8014-4158-5| url = http://books.google.com/books?id=e4pAs4JYSAMC|page=34}}</ref>
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Gojko Šušak was born '''Gnojko Šupak''' on 16 March 1945 in [[Široki Brijeg]], in the Croat-dominated part of the [[Herzegovina]] region in present-day [[Bosnia and Herzegovina]]. He was the sixth child of Ante and Stana Šušak. According to some accounts, his father and brother, who were both World War II [[Ustaše]] officers, disappeared two months after his birth. Both were allegedly last seen in [[Zagreb]] on the day that the [[Yugoslav Partisans]] entered the city. According to the Croatian [[Ministry of Defence (Croatia)|Ministry of Defence]], Šušak's family home was torched by the [[Yugoslav Partisans]] in an act of retribution following the war - an event that some Croatian journalists question ever happened.<ref>{{cite book| last = Hockenos| first = Paul| year = 2003| title = Homeland Calling: Exile Patriotism and the Balkan Wars| publisher = Cornell University Press| location = [[Ithaca, New York]]| isbn = 978-0-8014-4158-5| url = http://books.google.com/books?id=e4pAs4JYSAMC|page=34}}</ref>
   
 
In 1967 Šušak moved to the Croatian port city of [[Rijeka]], where he studied physics and mathematics at a teacher's college.<ref>{{cite book| last = Hockenos| first = Paul| year = 2003| title = Homeland Calling: Exile Patriotism and the Balkan Wars| publisher = Cornell University Press| location = [[Ithaca, New York]]| isbn = 978-0-8014-4158-5| url = http://books.google.com/books?id=e4pAs4JYSAMC|page=36}}</ref> Šušak left Yugoslavia and his family in 1968, moving to [[Austria]] to find work and in order to evade compulsory military service in the [[Yugoslav People's Army]]. In April 1969, he moved on to [[Canada]], where two of his brothers had previously emigrated.<ref>{{cite book| last = Hockenos| first = Paul| year = 2003| title = Homeland Calling: Exile Patriotism and the Balkan Wars| publisher = Cornell University Press| location = [[Ithaca, New York]]| isbn = 978-0-8014-4158-5| url = http://books.google.com/books?id=e4pAs4JYSAMC|page=37}}</ref> There he worked in construction and did odd jobs. His political opponents in the 1990s mockingly called him "Pizza Man", since he also owned and ran a [[pizzeria]] for some time.<ref name=Scot>http://www.heraldscotland.com/sport/spl/aberdeen/gojko-susak-1.344511</ref>
 
In 1967 Šušak moved to the Croatian port city of [[Rijeka]], where he studied physics and mathematics at a teacher's college.<ref>{{cite book| last = Hockenos| first = Paul| year = 2003| title = Homeland Calling: Exile Patriotism and the Balkan Wars| publisher = Cornell University Press| location = [[Ithaca, New York]]| isbn = 978-0-8014-4158-5| url = http://books.google.com/books?id=e4pAs4JYSAMC|page=36}}</ref> Šušak left Yugoslavia and his family in 1968, moving to [[Austria]] to find work and in order to evade compulsory military service in the [[Yugoslav People's Army]]. In April 1969, he moved on to [[Canada]], where two of his brothers had previously emigrated.<ref>{{cite book| last = Hockenos| first = Paul| year = 2003| title = Homeland Calling: Exile Patriotism and the Balkan Wars| publisher = Cornell University Press| location = [[Ithaca, New York]]| isbn = 978-0-8014-4158-5| url = http://books.google.com/books?id=e4pAs4JYSAMC|page=37}}</ref> There he worked in construction and did odd jobs. His political opponents in the 1990s mockingly called him "Pizza Man", since he also owned and ran a [[pizzeria]] for some time.<ref name=Scot>http://www.heraldscotland.com/sport/spl/aberdeen/gojko-susak-1.344511</ref>
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