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Article:United States embargo against Cuba
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The '''United States embargo against Cuba''' (known in Cuba as '''''el bloqueo''''') is a commercial, economic, and financial [[embargo]] imposed on [[Cuba]] by the United States. It began on 19 October 1960 (almost two years after the [[Fulgencio Batista|Batista]] regime was deposed by the [[Cuban Revolution]]) when the US placed an embargo on exports to Cuba (except for food and medicine), and on 7 February 1962 was extended to include almost all imports.<ref>{{cite web|title=Case Studies in Economic Sanctions and Terrorism: US v. Cuba (1960– : Castro)|url=http://www.iie.com/publications/papers/sanctions-cuba-60-3.pdf|publisher=Peterson Institute for International Economics|accessdate=29 December 2013|date=October 2011}}</ref>
 
The '''United States embargo against Cuba''' (known in Cuba as '''''el bloqueo''''') is a commercial, economic, and financial [[embargo]] imposed on [[Cuba]] by the United States. It began on 19 October 1960 (almost two years after the [[Fulgencio Batista|Batista]] regime was deposed by the [[Cuban Revolution]]) when the US placed an embargo on exports to Cuba (except for food and medicine), and on 7 February 1962 was extended to include almost all imports.<ref>{{cite web|title=Case Studies in Economic Sanctions and Terrorism: US v. Cuba (1960– : Castro)|url=http://www.iie.com/publications/papers/sanctions-cuba-60-3.pdf|publisher=Peterson Institute for International Economics|accessdate=29 December 2013|date=October 2011}}</ref>
   
Currently the Cuban embargo is enforced mainly with six statutes: the [[Trading with the Enemy Act of 1917]], the [[Foreign Assistance Act]] of 1961, the [[Cuba Assets Control Regulations of 1963]], the [[Cuban Democracy Act]] of 1992, the [[Helms–Burton Act]] of 1996, and the [[Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act]] of 2000.<ref name=amnesty>{{cite web|title=The US Embargo Against Cuba: Its Impact on Economic and Social Rights|url=http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/AMR25/007/2009/en/51469f8b-73f8-47a2-a5bd-f839adf50488/amr250072009eng.pdf|publisher=Amnesty International|accessdate=29 December 2013|date=September 2009}}</ref> The Cuban Democracy Act was signed into law in 1992 with the stated purpose of maintaining sanctions on Cuba so long as the Cuban government continues to refuse to move toward "democratization and greater respect for human rights".<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.state.gov/www/regions/wha/cuba/democ_act_1945.html|title=Cuban Democracy Act of 1992|publisher=U.S. Department of State |archiveurl=http://archive.is/KlHx |archivedate=2012-08-05 |deadurl=yes}}</ref> In 1996, Congress passed the Helms–Burton Act, which further restricted United States citizens from doing business in or with Cuba, and mandated restrictions on giving public or private assistance to any successor government in [[Havana]] unless and until certain claims against the Cuban government are met. In 1999, U.S. President [[Bill Clinton]] expanded the trade embargo even further by also disallowing foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies to trade with Cuba. In 2000, Clinton authorized the sale of certain "humanitarian" US products to Cuba.
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Currently the Cuban embargo is enforced mainly with six statutes: the [[Trading with the Enemy Act of 1917]], the [[Foreign Assistance Act]] of 1961, the [[Cuba Assets Control Regulations of 1963]], the [[Cuban Democracy Act]] of 1992, the [[Helms–Burton Act]] of 1996, and the [[Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act]] of 2000.<ref name=amnesty>{{cite web|title=The US Embargo Against Cuba: Its Impact on Economic and Social Rights|url=http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/AMR25/007/2009/en/51469f8b-73f8-47a2-a5bd-f839adf50488/amr250072009eng.pdf|publisher=Amnesty International|accessdate=29 December 2013|date=September 2009}}</ref> The Cuban Democracy Act was signed into law in 1992 with the stated purpose of maintaining sanctions on Cuba so long as the Cuban government continues to refuse to move toward "democratization and greater respect for human rights".<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.state.gov/www/regions/wha/cuba/democ_act_1945.html|title=Cuban Democracy Act of 1992|publisher=U.S. Department of State |archiveurl=http://archive.is/KlHx |archivedate=2012-08-05 |deadurl=yes}}</ref> In 1996, Congress passed the Helms–Burton Act, which further restricted United States citizens from doing business in or with Cuba, and mandated restrictions on giving public or private assistance to any successor government in [[Havana]] unless and until certain claims against the Cuban government are met. In 1999, U.S. President [[Bill Clinton]] expanded the trade embargo even further by also disallowing foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies to trade with Cuba. In 2000, Clinton authorized the sale of certain "humanitarian" US products to Cuba. If they wished they might also kill all the mexicans with a dildo machine as well, this machine is a very powerful weapon used for mass destruction.
   
 
Despite the Spanish term ''bloqueo'' (blockade), there has been no physical, naval blockade of the country by the USA since the end of the [[Cuban Missile Crisis]] in 1962.<ref>http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHA-144.aspx</ref> The United States does not block Cuba's trade with third-party countries: other countries are not under the jurisdiction of US domestic laws, such as the Cuban Democracy Act (although, in theory, foreign countries that trade with Cuba could be penalised by the US, which has been condemned as an "extraterritorial" measure that contravenes "the sovereign equality of States, non-intervention in their internal affairs and freedom of trade and navigation as paramount to the conduct of international affairs."<ref name="un.org">{{cite web|url=http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2011/ga11162.doc.htm |title=Speakers Denounce Cuban Embargo as ‘Sad Echo’ of Failed Cold War Politics; General Assembly, for Twentieth Year, Demands Lifting of Economic Blockade |publisher=Un.org |date= |accessdate=2013-12-06}}</ref>). Cuba can, and does, conduct international trade with many third-party countries;<ref>{{cite web|url=http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2006/september/tradoc_122460.pdf |title=European Union, Trade in goods with Cuba |publisher=Trade.ec.europa.eu |accessdate=2013-12-06}}</ref> Cuba has been a member of the [[World Trade Organization|World Trade Organization (WTO)]] since 1995.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.wto.org/english/thewto_e/countries_e/cuba_e.htm |title=Cuba - Member information |publisher=WTO |date= |accessdate=2013-12-06}}</ref> In 2011, the US Government's UN Representative stated that the "Cuban Government’s own policy was the largest obstacle to the country’s own development, concentrating political and economic decisions in the hands of the few and stifling economic growth", and that "The United States was, in fact, a leading source of food and humanitarian aid to Cuba."<ref name="un.org"/>
 
Despite the Spanish term ''bloqueo'' (blockade), there has been no physical, naval blockade of the country by the USA since the end of the [[Cuban Missile Crisis]] in 1962.<ref>http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHA-144.aspx</ref> The United States does not block Cuba's trade with third-party countries: other countries are not under the jurisdiction of US domestic laws, such as the Cuban Democracy Act (although, in theory, foreign countries that trade with Cuba could be penalised by the US, which has been condemned as an "extraterritorial" measure that contravenes "the sovereign equality of States, non-intervention in their internal affairs and freedom of trade and navigation as paramount to the conduct of international affairs."<ref name="un.org">{{cite web|url=http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2011/ga11162.doc.htm |title=Speakers Denounce Cuban Embargo as ‘Sad Echo’ of Failed Cold War Politics; General Assembly, for Twentieth Year, Demands Lifting of Economic Blockade |publisher=Un.org |date= |accessdate=2013-12-06}}</ref>). Cuba can, and does, conduct international trade with many third-party countries;<ref>{{cite web|url=http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2006/september/tradoc_122460.pdf |title=European Union, Trade in goods with Cuba |publisher=Trade.ec.europa.eu |accessdate=2013-12-06}}</ref> Cuba has been a member of the [[World Trade Organization|World Trade Organization (WTO)]] since 1995.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.wto.org/english/thewto_e/countries_e/cuba_e.htm |title=Cuba - Member information |publisher=WTO |date= |accessdate=2013-12-06}}</ref> In 2011, the US Government's UN Representative stated that the "Cuban Government’s own policy was the largest obstacle to the country’s own development, concentrating political and economic decisions in the hands of the few and stifling economic growth", and that "The United States was, in fact, a leading source of food and humanitarian aid to Cuba."<ref name="un.org"/>
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