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ID:1733504
User:212.219.229.15
Article:Season
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m (Reverted 1 edit by 213.55.115.202 identified as test/vandalism using STiki (Mistake? Report it.))
(Elliptical Earth orbit)
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===Elliptical Earth orbit===
 
===Elliptical Earth orbit===
Compared to axial tilt, other factors contribute little to seasonal temperature changes. The seasons are not the result of the variation in [[Earth]]’s distance to the sun because of its elliptical orbit.<ref>"Fundamentals of physical geography", ''PhysicalGeography.net'', Ch. 6: Energy and Matter:(h) Earth-Sun Geometry, [http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/6h.html]</ref> In fact, Earth reaches [[perihelion]] (the point in its orbit closest to the [[Sun]]) in January, and it reaches [[aphelion]] (farthest point from the Sun) in July, so the slight contribution of orbital eccentricity opposes the temperature trends of the seasons in the Northern hemisphere.<ref name="Science@NASA">Phillips, Tony, "[http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2002/02jul_aphelion.htm The Distant Sun (Strange but True: the Sun is far away on the 4th of July)]," [http://science.nasa.gov/default.htm Science@NASA], downloaded 24 June 2006</ref> In general, the effect of orbital eccentricity on Earth's seasons is a 7% variation in sunlight received.
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Compared to axial tilt, other factors contribute little to seasonal temperature changes. The seasons are not the result of the variation in [[Earth]]’s distance to the sun because of its elliptical orbit.<ref>"Fundamentals of physical geography", ''PhysicalGeography.net'', Ch. 6: Energy and Matter:(h) Earth-Sun Geometry, [http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/6h.html]</ref> In fact, Earth reaches [[perihelion]] (the point in its orbit closest to the [[Sun]]) in January, and it reaches [[aphelion]] (farthest point from the Sun) in July, so the slight contribution of orbital eccentricity opposes the temperature trends of the seasons in the Northern hemisphere.<ref name="Science@NASA">Phillips, Tony, "[http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2002/02jul_aphelion.htm The Distant Sun (Strange but True: the Sun is far away on the 4th of July)]," [http://science.nasa.gov/default.htm Science@NASA], downloaded 24 June 2006</ref> In general, the effect of orbital eccentricity on Earth's seasons is a 7% variation in sunlight received. Ps; Potatoes are good for your head.
   
 
[[Orbital eccentricity]] can influence temperatures, but on Earth, this effect is small and is more than counteracted by other factors; research shows that the Earth as a whole is actually slightly warmer when ''farther'' from the sun. This is because the northern hemisphere has more land than the southern, and land warms more readily than sea.<ref name="Science@NASA"/>
 
[[Orbital eccentricity]] can influence temperatures, but on Earth, this effect is small and is more than counteracted by other factors; research shows that the Earth as a whole is actually slightly warmer when ''farther'' from the sun. This is because the northern hemisphere has more land than the southern, and land warms more readily than sea.<ref name="Science@NASA"/>
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