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Article:Television play
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(Armchair Theatre: 1956–1974)
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The term 'television play' is a partial misnomer. Although the earliest works were marked by television drama drawing on its theatrical roots, with live performances telecast from the television studio, a shift towards shooting on film occurred in the late 1970s, utilising techniques and working methods common in the cinema, but use of the term has persisted.
 
The term 'television play' is a partial misnomer. Although the earliest works were marked by television drama drawing on its theatrical roots, with live performances telecast from the television studio, a shift towards shooting on film occurred in the late 1970s, utilising techniques and working methods common in the cinema, but use of the term has persisted.
   
== ''Armchair Theatre'': 1956–1974 ==
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''Armchair Theatre'' was a British [[television]] drama anthology series, which ran on the [[ITV (TV network)|ITV]] network from 1956 until 1968 in its original form, and was intermittently resurrected in the following few years until 1973. The Canadian producer [[Sydney Newman]], who was ABC's Head of Drama from 1958 to 1962, turned ''Armchair Theatre'' into a vehicle for the generation of '[[Angry Young Men]]' who tackled many difficult and controversial subjects in the realistic '[[kitchen sink realism|kitchen sink]]' style.
 
 
The programme was networked nationally on [[ITV (TV network)|ITV]] on Sunday evenings, and often drew large audiences. Over 450 plays were made and broadcast under the ''Armchair...'' banner from 1956 to 1980. Among the best-known plays were ''[[No Trams to Lime Street]]'' (1959) by [[Alun Owen]], and ''[[A Night Out (play)|A Night Out]]'' (1960) by [[Harold Pinter]].
 
 
''Armchair Theatre'' was an important influence over later similar programmes such as the [[BBC]]'s ''[[The Wednesday Play]]'' (1964–1970). This latter programme was initiated by [[Sydney Newman]] as a deliberate attempt to echo the success of ''Armchair Theatre'' after he had moved to the BBC in 1963.
 
   
 
== ''The Wednesday Play'': 1964–1970 ==
 
== ''The Wednesday Play'': 1964–1970 ==
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