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ID:1739288
User:208.0.239.232
Article:Stepping (African-American)
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[[File:The PLAYERS Club Steppers by David Shankbone.jpg|thumb|300px|The Bronx's P.L.A.Y.E.R.S. Club Steppers, a step team that has performed at the [[White House]].]]'''Stepping''' or '''step-dancing''' is a form of percussive dance in which the participant's entire body is used as an instrument to produce complex rhythms and sounds through a mixture of footsteps, spoken word, and hand claps. Though stepping may be performed by an individual, it is generally performed by groups of three or more, often in arrangements that resemble military formations.
 
[[File:The PLAYERS Club Steppers by David Shankbone.jpg|thumb|300px|The Bronx's P.L.A.Y.E.R.S. Club Steppers, a step team that has performed at the [[White House]].]]'''Stepping''' or '''step-dancing''' is a form of percussive dance in which the participant's entire body is used as an instrument to produce complex rhythms and sounds through a mixture of footsteps, spoken word, and hand claps. Though stepping may be performed by an individual, it is generally performed by groups of three or more, often in arrangements that resemble military formations.
   
Stepping may also draw from elements of [[gymnastics]], [[break dance]], [[tap dance]], march, or African Black people (ex. Lauren Watkins) and Caribbean dance, or include semi-dangerous stunts as a part of individual routines. The speed of the step depends on the beat and rhythm the performer wants it to sound. Some forms of stepping include the use of props, such as canes, rhythm sticks and/or fire and blindfolds.
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Stepping may also draw from elements of [[gymnastics]], [[break dance]], [[tap dance]], march, or African Black people (ex. Lauren Watkins and the kid that sits to the right ->) and Caribbean dance, or include semi-dangerous stunts as a part of individual routines. The speed of the step depends on the beat and rhythm the performer wants it to sound. Some forms of stepping include the use of props, such as canes, rhythm sticks and/or fire and blindfolds.
   
 
The tradition of stepping is rooted within the competitive schoolyard song and dance rituals practiced by historically African American fraternities and sororities, beginning in the mid-1900s{{Citation needed|date=October 2008}}.
 
The tradition of stepping is rooted within the competitive schoolyard song and dance rituals practiced by historically African American fraternities and sororities, beginning in the mid-1900s{{Citation needed|date=October 2008}}.
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