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Article:Happy Birthday to You
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{{About|the song|the Dr. Seuss book|Happy Birthday to You!}}
 
{{About|the song|the Dr. Seuss book|Happy Birthday to You!}}
   
"'''Happy Birthday to You'''", also known more simply as "'''Happy Birthday'''", is a song that is traditionally sung to celebrate the [[birthday|anniversary of a person's birth]]. According to the 1998 ''[[Guinness Book of World Records]]'', "Happy Birthday to You" is the most recognized song in the [[English language]], followed by "[[For He's a Jolly Good Fellow]]". The song's base lyrics have been translated into at least 18 languages.<ref name="brauneis">{{cite web |last=Brauneis |first=Robert |title=Copyright and the World's Most Popular Song |url=http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1111624 |date=2008-03-21 |accessdate=2008-05-08 |postscript=<!--None-->}}</ref><sup>, p.&nbsp;17</sup>
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"'''Happy Birthday to You'''", also known more simply as "'''Happy Birthday'''", is a song that is traditionally sung to celebrate the [[birthday| Clayton E. Summy Co., 1896), as cited by Snyder, Agnes. ''Dauntless Women in Childhood Education, 1856-1931''. 1972. Washington, D.C.: Asbecause im rightless royalties are paid to it. In one specific instance on February 2010, these royalties were said to amount to $700.<ref name="Wendy_Williams">[[Wendy Williams (media personality)|Wendy Williams]] said "We paid $700 to say happy birthday. You got to pay for the song." during an episode of [[The Wendy Williams Show|her show]], {{cite web|title=Transcript of 5 Feb 2010 episode of 'The Wendy Williams Show' | url=http://www.livedash.com/transcript/the_wendy_williams_show/7650/BETP/Friday_February_5_2010/186147/#943921726 | accessdate=1 May 2011 | date=5 Feb 2010}}</ref> In the [[European Union]], the copyright of the song will expire on December 31, 2016.<ref name="ReferenceA">EU countries observe the "life + 70" copyright standard.</ref> The actual American copyright status of "Happy Birthday to You" began to draw more attention with the passage of the [[Copyright Term Extension Act]] in 1998. When the [[Supreme Court of the United States|U.S. Supreme Court]] upheld the Act iirthday to You" in his dissenting opinion.<ref>[http://laws.findlaw.com/us/537/186.html 537 US 186], Justice Stevens, dissenting, II, C.</ref> An American law professor who heavily researched the song has expressed strong doubts that it is still under copyright.<ref name="brauneis"/>
 
The melody of "Happy Birthday to You" comes from the song "'''Good Morning to All'''", which was written and composed by [[United States|American]] siblings [[Patty Hill]] and [[Mildred J. Hill]] in 1893.<ref name=slate>{{cite news |author=[[Paul Collins (writer)|Paul Collins]] |coauthors= |title=You Say It's Your Birthday. Does the infamous "Happy Birthday to You" copyright hold up to scrutiny? |url=http://www.slate.com/id/2298271/ |quote= |newspaper=[[Slate magazine]] |date=July 21, 2011 |accessdate=2011-08-09 }}</ref><ref>Originally published in ''Song Stories for the Kindergarten'' (Chicago: Clayton E. Summy Co., 1896), as cited by Snyder, Agnes. ''Dauntless Women in Childhood Education, 1856-1931''. 1972. Washington, D.C.: Association for Childhood Education International. p. 244.</ref> Patty was a kindergarten principal in [[Louisville, Kentucky]], developing various teaching methods at what is now the [[Little Loomhouse]];<ref>[http://www.ket.org/cgi-bin/fw_louisvillelife.exe/db/ket/dmps/Programs?do=topic&topicid=LOUL030013&id=LOUL KET - History: Little Loomhouse<!-- Bot generated title -->]</ref> Mildred was a pianist and composer.<ref name="brauneis"/><sup>, p.&nbsp;7</sup> The sisters created "Good Morning to All" as a song that would be easy to be sung by young children.<ref name="brauneis"/><sup>, p.&nbsp;14</sup>
 
 
The combination of melody and lyrics in "Happy Birthday to You" first appeared in print in 1912, and probably existed even earlier.<ref name="brauneis"/><sup>, pp.&nbsp;31–32</sup> None of these early appearances included credits or [[copyright]] notices. The Summy Company registered for copyright in 1935, crediting authors [[Preston Ware Orem]] and Mrs. R.R. Forman.{{Citation needed|date=September 2011}} In 1990, [[Warner/Chappell Music|Warner Chappell]] purchased the company owning the copyright for $15 million, with the value of "Happy Birthday" estimated at $5 million.<ref>[http://www.princetoninfo.com/200303/30326p04.html#%60Happy%20Birthday'%20Connection Uncorking that Joyful Noise]</ref> Based on the 1935 copyright registration, Warner claims that the United States copyright will not expire until 2030, and that unauthorized public performances of the song are technically illegal unless royalties are paid to it. In one specific instance on February 2010, these royalties were said to amount to $700.<ref name="Wendy_Williams">[[Wendy Williams (media personality)|Wendy Williams]] said "We paid $700 to say happy birthday. You got to pay for the song." during an episode of [[The Wendy Williams Show|her show]], {{cite web|title=Transcript of 5 Feb 2010 episode of 'The Wendy Williams Show' | url=http://www.livedash.com/transcript/the_wendy_williams_show/7650/BETP/Friday_February_5_2010/186147/#943921726 | accessdate=1 May 2011 | date=5 Feb 2010}}</ref> In the [[European Union]], the copyright of the song will expire on December 31, 2016.<ref name="ReferenceA">EU countries observe the "life + 70" copyright standard.</ref> The actual American copyright status of "Happy Birthday to You" began to draw more attention with the passage of the [[Copyright Term Extension Act]] in 1998. When the [[Supreme Court of the United States|U.S. Supreme Court]] upheld the Act in ''[[Eldred v. Ashcroft]]'' in 2003, [[Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States|Associate Justice]] [[Stephen Breyer]] specifically mentioned "Happy Birthday to You" in his dissenting opinion.<ref>[http://laws.findlaw.com/us/537/186.html 537 US 186], Justice Stevens, dissenting, II, C.</ref> An American law professor who heavily researched the song has expressed strong doubts that it is still under copyright.<ref name="brauneis"/>
 
   
 
==Lyrics==
 
==Lyrics==
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