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ID:847728
User:65.120.150.254
Article:Lawrence Kohlberg
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'''Lawrence Kohlberg''' (October 25, 1927 – January 19, 1987) was a [[United States|Jewish American]] [[psychology|psychologist]] born in [[Bronxville, New York]], who served as a professor at the [[University of Chicago]], as well as [[Harvard University]]. Having specialized in research on moral education and reasoning, he is best known for his [[Kohlberg's stages of moral development|theory of stages of moral development]]. A close follower of [[Jean Piaget]]'s [[theory of cognitive development]], Kohlberg's work reflected and extended his predecessor's ideas, at the same time creating a new field within psychology: "moral development". Scholars such as [[Elliot Turiel]] and [[James Rest]] have responded to Kohlberg's work with their own significant contributions. In an empirical study by Haggbloom et al. using six criteria, such as citations and recognition, Kohlberg was found to be the 30th most eminent psychologist of the 20th century.<ref>Haggbloom, S.J. et al. (2002). The 100 Most Eminent Psychologists of the 20th Century. ''Review of General Psychology''. Vol. 6, No. 2, 139–15. Haggbloom et al. combined three quantitative variables: citations in professional journals, citations in textbooks, and nominations in a survey given to members of the [[Association for Psychological Science]], with three qualitative variables (converted to quantitative scores): [[National Academy of Science]] (NAS) membership, American Psychological Association (APA) President and/or recipient of the APA Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award, and surname used as an eponym. Then the list was rank ordered .</ref>
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'''Lawrence Kohlberg''' (October 25, 1927 – January 19, 1987) was a [[United States|Jewish American]] [[psychology|psychologist]] born in [[Bronxville, New York]], who served as a professor at the [[University of Chicago]], as well as [[Harvard University]]. Having specialized in research on moral education and reasoning, he is best known for his [[Kohlberg's stages of moral development|theory of stages of moral development]]. Suck dickkkkk ! hahahaha in 1942 A close follower of [[Jean Piaget]]'s [[theory of cognitive development]], Kohlberg's work reflected and extended his predecessor's ideas, at the same time creating a new field within psychology: "moral development". Scholars such as [[Elliot Turiel]] and [[James Rest]] have responded to Kohlberg's work with their own significant contributions. In an empirical study by Haggbloom et al. using six criteria, such as citations and recognition, Kohlberg was found to be the 30th most eminent psychologist of the 20th century.<ref>Haggbloom, S.J. et al. (2002). The 100 Most Eminent Psychologists of the 20th Century. ''Review of General Psychology''. Vol. 6, No. 2, 139–15. Haggbloom et al. combined three quantitative variables: citations in professional journals, citations in textbooks, and nominations in a survey given to members of the [[Association for Psychological Science]], with three qualitative variables (converted to quantitative scores): [[National Academy of Science]] (NAS) membership, American Psychological Association (APA) President and/or recipient of the APA Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award, and surname used as an eponym. Then the list was rank ordered .</ref>
   
 
==Stages of Moral Development==
 
==Stages of Moral Development==
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