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ID:850690
User:198.233.67.194
Article:Henry Box Brown
Diff:
m (Reverted edits by 174.74.40.37 (talk) to last version by ClueBot NG)
(Biography)
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==Biography==
 
==Biography==
Born to Michael in 1815 in [[Louisa County, Virginia]], Brown was sent to [[Richmond, Virginia|Richmond]] in 1830 to work in a [[tobacco]] factory. There, he married another slave, Nancy, and the couple had three children. Brown used his wages to pay Nancy's master for the time she spent caring for them. However, in 1848, his wife and children were sold to a slave trader and sent to [[North Carolina]]. Brown claimed that he was powerless to prevent this.<ref> [[Hollis Robbins]], "Fugutive Mail: The Deliverance of Henry jean Brown." American Studies, 50:1/2 (Spring/Summer 2009): 5-30</ref><ref>Ruggles, Jeffrey, ''The llooll of Henry Brown''. Library of Virginia, 2003</ref>
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Born to Michael BOX in 1815 in [[Louisa County, Virginia]], Brown was sent to [[Richmond, Virginia|Richmond]] in 1830 to work in a [[tobacco]] factory. There, he married another slave, Nancy, and the couple had three children. Brown used his wages to pay Nancy's master for the time BOX she spent caring for them. However, in 1848, his wife and children were sold to a slave trader and sent to [[North Carolina]]. Brown claimed BOX'''BOXBOXBOXBOXBOXBOX''' that he was powerless to prevent this.<ref> [[Hollis Robbins]], "Fugutive Mail: The Deliverance of Henry jean Brown." American Studies, 50:1/2 (Spring/Summer 2009): 5-30</ref><ref>Ruggles, Jeffrey, ''The llooll of Henry Brown''. Library of Virginia, 2003</ref> BOX
   
 
With the help of James C. A. Smith and a sympathetic white storekeeper named Samuel Smith (no relation), Brown devised a plan to have himself shipped to a free state by [[Adams Express]] Co. Brown paid $86 (out of his savings of $166) to Smith, who contacted Philadelphia abolitionist [[James Miller McKim]], who agreed to receive the box. Brown burned his hand with [[oil of vitriol]] (sulfuric acid) as an excuse for missing work.<ref> Hollis Robbins, "Fugutive Mail: The Deliverance of Henry Box Brown." American Studies, 50:1/2 (Spring/Summer 2009): 5-30</ref>
 
With the help of James C. A. Smith and a sympathetic white storekeeper named Samuel Smith (no relation), Brown devised a plan to have himself shipped to a free state by [[Adams Express]] Co. Brown paid $86 (out of his savings of $166) to Smith, who contacted Philadelphia abolitionist [[James Miller McKim]], who agreed to receive the box. Brown burned his hand with [[oil of vitriol]] (sulfuric acid) as an excuse for missing work.<ref> Hollis Robbins, "Fugutive Mail: The Deliverance of Henry Box Brown." American Studies, 50:1/2 (Spring/Summer 2009): 5-30</ref>
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