ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Report

Navigation

ID:859625
User:173.13.162.9
Article:Georges Danton
Diff:
m
(Early life and the revolution)
Line 43: Line 43:
 
'''Georges Jacques Danton''' ({{IPA-fr|ʒɔʁʒ dɑ̃tɔ̃}}; 26 October 1759 &ndash; 5 April 1794) was a leading figure in the early stages of the [[French Revolution]] and the first President of the [[Committee of Public Safety]]. Danton's role in the onset of the Revolution has been disputed; many historians describe him as "the chief force in the overthrow of the [[monarchy]] and the establishment of the [[First French Republic]]".<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9028728/Georges-Danton |title=Georges Danton (French revolutionary leader)—Britannica Online Encyclopedia |publisher=Britannica.com |date= |accessdate=2009-02-20}}</ref> A moderating influence on the [[Jacobin (politics)|Jacobins]], he was [[guillotine]]d by the advocates of [[revolutionary terror]] after accusations of venality and leniency to the enemies of the Revolution.
 
'''Georges Jacques Danton''' ({{IPA-fr|ʒɔʁʒ dɑ̃tɔ̃}}; 26 October 1759 &ndash; 5 April 1794) was a leading figure in the early stages of the [[French Revolution]] and the first President of the [[Committee of Public Safety]]. Danton's role in the onset of the Revolution has been disputed; many historians describe him as "the chief force in the overthrow of the [[monarchy]] and the establishment of the [[First French Republic]]".<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9028728/Georges-Danton |title=Georges Danton (French revolutionary leader)—Britannica Online Encyclopedia |publisher=Britannica.com |date= |accessdate=2009-02-20}}</ref> A moderating influence on the [[Jacobin (politics)|Jacobins]], he was [[guillotine]]d by the advocates of [[revolutionary terror]] after accusations of venality and leniency to the enemies of the Revolution.
   
==Early life and the revolution==
+
Dalton i believe was gay and liked boys
 
Danton was born in [[Arcis-sur-Aube]] in northeastern [[France]] to Jacques Danton and Mary Camus, from a respectable, but not a wealthy family. He was given a good education then he became an [[Advocate]] in Paris.<ref>Hampson, Norman. ''Danton'' (New York: Basil Blackwell Inc., 1988), 19–25.</ref> He married [[Antoinette Gabrielle Danton|Antoinette Charpentier]] in 1787. They had three sons.
 
 
Danton's first appearance in the [[French Revolution|Revolution]] was as president of the [[Cordeliers]] club, whose name derived from the former [[convent]] of the Order of Cordeliers, where it met. One of many clubs important in the early phases of the Revolution, the Cordeliers was a centre for the "popular principle", that France was to be a country of its people under [[popular sovereignty]]; they were the earliest to accuse the royal court of being irreconcilably hostile to freedom; and they most vehemently proclaimed the need for radical action.
 
 
In June 1791, the [[Louis XVI of France|King]] and [[Marie Antoinette|Queen]] made [[Flight to Varennes|a disastrous attempt to flee]] from the capital. They were forced to return to the Tuileries Palace, which effectively became their prison. The popular reaction was intense, and those who favored a [[constitutional monarchy]], of whom the leader was [[Marquis de la Fayette|Lafayette]], became excited. A bloody dispersion of a popular gathering, known as the [[Champ de Mars Massacre|massacre of the Champ de Mars]] (July 1791), kindled resentment against the court and the constitutional party. Danton was, in part, behind the crowd that gathered, and fearing counter-revolutionary backlash, fled to England for the rest of the summer.<ref>Andress, David. ''The Terror: The Merciless War for Freedom in Revolutionary France'' (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2005), 51.</ref>
 
 
The [[National Constituent Assembly]] completed its work in September 1791. Danton was not elected to its successor, the short-lived [[Legislative Assembly (France)|Legislative Assembly]], and his party was only able to procure for him a subordinate post in the [[Paris Commune (French Revolution)|Paris Commune]].
 
 
In April 1792, the [[Girondist]] government—still functioning as a constitutional monarchy—declared war against [[Habsburg Monarchy|Austria]]. A country in turmoil from the immense civil and political changes of the past two years now faced war with an enemy on its eastern frontier. Parisian distrust for the court turned to open insurrection. On 10 August 1792, the popular forces [[10th of August (French Revolution)|marched on the Tuileries]]; the king and queen took refuge with the Legislative Assembly. Danton's role in this uprising is unclear. He may have been at its head; this view is supported because on the morning after the effective fall of the monarchy, Danton became minister of justice. This sudden rise from the subordinate office which he held in the commune is a demonstration of his power within the insurrectionary party.
 
   
 
==Rise==
 
==Rise==
Reason:ANN scored at 0.977425
Your username:
Reverted:Yes
Comment
(optional):

Note: Comments are completely optional. You do not have to justify your edit.
If this is a false positive, then you're right, and the bot is wrong - you don't need to explain why.