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ID:878498
User:155.69.203.1
Article:Stump (cricket)
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(Undid revision 475957747 by 31.205.42.104 (talk))
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Being "out of his ground" is defined as not having any part of the batsman's body or his bat touching the ground behind the crease - i.e., if his bat is slightly elevated from the floor despite being behind the crease, or if his foot is on the crease line itself but not completely across it and touching the ground behind it, then he would be considered out (if stumped). One of the fielding team (such as the wicket-keeper himself) must appeal for the wicket by asking the umpire. The appeal is normally directed to the square-leg umpire, who would be in the best position to adjudicate on the appeal.
 
Being "out of his ground" is defined as not having any part of the batsman's body or his bat touching the ground behind the crease - i.e., if his bat is slightly elevated from the floor despite being behind the crease, or if his foot is on the crease line itself but not completely across it and touching the ground behind it, then he would be considered out (if stumped). One of the fielding team (such as the wicket-keeper himself) must appeal for the wicket by asking the umpire. The appeal is normally directed to the square-leg umpire, who would be in the best position to adjudicate on the appeal.
   
Stumping is the fifth most common form of dismissal after [[caught]], [[bowled]], [[leg before wicket]] and [[run out]], though it is seen more commonly in [[Twenty20]] cricket because of its more-aggressive batting. It is governed by Law 39 of the [[Laws of cricket]]. It is usually seen when a medium or slow [[bowler (cricket)|bowler]] is bowling, as with fast bowlers a wicket-keeper takes the ball too far back from the wicket to attempt a stumping. It requires co-operation between a bowler and wicket-keeper: the bowler must induce the batsman to move out of his ground, and the wicket-keeper must catch and break the wicket before the batsman realises he has missed the ball and ''makes his ground,'' i.e. places the bat or part of his body on the ground back behind the [[Crease (cricket)|popping crease]]. If the bails are removed before the wicket-keeper has the ball, the batsman can still be stumped if the wicket-keeper removes one of the stumps from the ground, while holding the ball in his hand. The bowler is credited for the batsman's wicket, and the wicket-keeper is credited for the dismissal. A batsman may be out stumped off a [[no ball]], and [[wide (cricket)|wide]] delivery.
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Stumping is the fifth most common form of dismissal after [[caught]], [[bowled]], [[leg before wicket]] and [[run out]], though it is seen more commonly in [[Twenty20]] cricket because of its more-aggressive batting. It is governed by Law 39 of the [[Laws of cricket]]. It is usually seen when a medium or slow [[bowler (cricket)|bowler]] is bowling, as with fast bowlers a wicket-keeper takes the ball too far back from the wicket to attempt a stumping. It requires co-operation between a bowler and wicket-keeper: the bowler must induce the batsman to move out of his ground, and the wicket-keeper must catch and break the wicket before the batsman realises he has missed the ball and ''makes his ground,'' i.e. places the bat or part of his body on the ground back behind the [[Crease (cricket)|popping crease]]. If the bails are removed before the wicket-keeper has the ball, the batsman can still be stumped if the wicket-keeper removes one of the stumps from the ground, while holding the ball in his hand. The bowler is credited for the batsman's wicket, and the wicket-keeper is credited for the dismissal. A batsman may not be out stumped off a [[no ball]], but may be stumped off a [[wide (cricket)|wide]] delivery.
   
 
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