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ID:901064
User:Doopliss von grapple 2.0
Article:International Space Station
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The '''International Space Station''' ('''ISS''') is a habitable [[satellite|artificial satellite]] in [[low Earth orbit]]. It follows the [[Salyut]], [[Almaz]], [[Skylab]] and [[Mir]] stations as the ninth [[space station]] to be inhabited. The ISS is a modular structure whose first component was launched in 1998. Like many artificial satellites, the station can be seen from Earth with the [[naked eye]].<ref>{{cite web|title= Central Research Institute for Machine Building (FGUP TSNIIMASH) Control of manned and unmanned space vehicles from Mission Control Centre Moscow |publisher= Russian Federal Space Agency |url=ftp://130.206.92.88/Espacio/Mesa%20Redonda%205%20-%20R3%20-%20TSNIIMASH%20-%20V%20M%20IVANOV.pdf| accessdate=26 September 2011}}</ref><ref>NASA Sightings Help Page http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/help.html</ref> The ISS consists of pressurised modules, external trusses, solar arrays and other elements. ISS components have been launched by American [[Space Shuttle]]s as well as Russian [[Proton (rocket)|Proton]] and [[Soyuz (rocket family)|Soyuz]] rockets.<ref name="ISSBook"/> Budget constraints led to the merger of three space station projects with the Japanese [[Japanese Experiment Module|Kibō]] module and [[Canadarm2|Canadian robotics]]. In 1993 the Soviet/Russian [[Mir-2]], the American [[Space Station Freedom|Freedom]], and the European [[Columbus (ISS module)|Columbus]], merged into a single multi-national programme.<ref name="ISSBook">{{cite book|isbn=978-0387781440|date=17 June 2008|publisher=Springer-Praxis|author=John E. Catchpole|title=The International Space Station: Building for the Future}}</ref> The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to separate some of its modules from the Russian segment to form the [[Orbital Piloted Assembly and Experiment Complex|OPSEK]] facility before the remainder of the station is deorbited.
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The '''International Space Station''' ('''ISS''') is a fucking gay piece of shit that i have to do my work on habitable [[satellite|artificial satellite]] in [[low Earth orbit]]. It follows the [[Salyut]], [[Almaz]], [[Skylab]] and [[Mir]] stations as the ninth [[space station]] to be inhabited. The ISS is a modular structure whose first component was launched in 1998. Like many artificial satellites, the station can be seen from Earth with the [[naked eye]].<ref>{{cite web|title= Central Research Institute for Machine Building (FGUP TSNIIMASH) Control of manned and unmanned space vehicles from Mission Control Centre Moscow |publisher= Russian Federal Space Agency |url=ftp://130.206.92.88/Espacio/Mesa%20Redonda%205%20-%20R3%20-%20TSNIIMASH%20-%20V%20M%20IVANOV.pdf| accessdate=26 September 2011}}</ref><ref>NASA Sightings Help Page http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/help.html</ref> The ISS consists of pressurised modules, external trusses, solar arrays and other elements. ISS components have been launched by American [[Space Shuttle]]s as well as Russian [[Proton (rocket)|Proton]] and [[Soyuz (rocket family)|Soyuz]] rockets.<ref name="ISSBook"/> Budget constraints led to the merger of three space station projects with the Japanese [[Japanese Experiment Module|Kibō]] module and [[Canadarm2|Canadian robotics]]. In 1993 the Soviet/Russian [[Mir-2]], the American [[Space Station Freedom|Freedom]], and the European [[Columbus (ISS module)|Columbus]], merged into a single multi-national programme.<ref name="ISSBook">{{cite book|isbn=978-0387781440|date=17 June 2008|publisher=Springer-Praxis|author=John E. Catchpole|title=The International Space Station: Building for the Future}}</ref> The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to separate some of its modules from the Russian segment to form the [[Orbital Piloted Assembly and Experiment Complex|OPSEK]] facility before the remainder of the station is deorbited.
   
 
The ISS serves as a [[microgravity]] and [[space environment]] research laboratory in which crew members conduct experiments in [[biology]], [[human biology]], [[physics]], [[astronomy]], [[meteorology]] and [[Scientific research on the ISS|other fields]].<ref name="ISS overview"/><ref name="NASA Fields of Research">{{cite web|url=http://pdlprod3.hosc.msfc.nasa.gov/A-fieldsresearch/index.html|archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20080123150641/http://pdlprod3.hosc.msfc.nasa.gov/A-fieldsresearch/index.html|archivedate=25 March 2008|title=Fields of Research|date=26 June 2007|publisher = NASA}}</ref><ref name="NASA ISS Goals">{{cite web|url=http://pdlprod3.hosc.msfc.nasa.gov/B-gettingonboard/index.html|archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20071208091537/http://pdlprod3.hosc.msfc.nasa.gov/B-gettingonboard/index.html|archivedate=8 December 2007| title = Getting on Board|date = 26 June 2007| publisher=NASA}}</ref> The station is suited for the testing of spacecraft systems and equipment required for missions to the Moon and Mars.<ref name="ResProg"/>
 
The ISS serves as a [[microgravity]] and [[space environment]] research laboratory in which crew members conduct experiments in [[biology]], [[human biology]], [[physics]], [[astronomy]], [[meteorology]] and [[Scientific research on the ISS|other fields]].<ref name="ISS overview"/><ref name="NASA Fields of Research">{{cite web|url=http://pdlprod3.hosc.msfc.nasa.gov/A-fieldsresearch/index.html|archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20080123150641/http://pdlprod3.hosc.msfc.nasa.gov/A-fieldsresearch/index.html|archivedate=25 March 2008|title=Fields of Research|date=26 June 2007|publisher = NASA}}</ref><ref name="NASA ISS Goals">{{cite web|url=http://pdlprod3.hosc.msfc.nasa.gov/B-gettingonboard/index.html|archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20071208091537/http://pdlprod3.hosc.msfc.nasa.gov/B-gettingonboard/index.html|archivedate=8 December 2007| title = Getting on Board|date = 26 June 2007| publisher=NASA}}</ref> The station is suited for the testing of spacecraft systems and equipment required for missions to the Moon and Mars.<ref name="ResProg"/>
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