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ID:913748
User:198.228.216.24
Article:Baruch ben Neriah
Diff:
m (r2.7.1) (Robot: Adding cs:Báruch (prorok))
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The Arabic-Christian legends identify Baruch with [[Zoroaster]], and give much information concerning him. Baruch, angry because the gift of prophecy had been denied him, and on account of the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple, left Palestine to found the religion of Zoroaster. The prophecy of the birth of [[Jesus]] from a virgin, and of his adoration by the [[Magi]], is also ascribed to Baruch-Zoroaster.<ref>Compare the complete collection of these legends in Gottheil, in "Classical Studies in Honor of H. Drisler," pp. 24-51, New York, 1894; Jackson, "Zoroaster," pp. 17, 165 et seq.</ref> It is difficult to explain the origin of this curious identification of a prophet with a magician, such as Zoroaster was held to be, among the Jews, [[Christian]]s, and Arabs. De Sacy<ref>"Notices et Extraits des MSS. de la Bibliothèque du Roi," ii. 319</ref> explains it on the ground that in Arabic the name of the prophet Jeremiah is almost identical with that of the city of Urmiah, where, it is said, Zoroaster lived. However, this may be, the Jewish legend mentioned above (under Baruch in Rabbinical Literature), according to which the Ethiopian in Jer. xxxviii. 7 is undoubtedly identical with Baruch, is connected with this Arabic-Christian legend. As early as the Clementine "Recognitiones" (iv. 27), Zoroaster was believed to be a descendant of [[Ham (son of Noah)|Ham]]; and, according to Gen. x. 6, Cush, the Ethiopian, is a son of Ham. According to the "Recognitiones",<ref>iv. 28</ref> the Persians believed that Zoroaster had been taken into heaven in a chariot ("ad cœlum vehiculo sublevatum"); and according to the Jewish legend, the above-mentioned Ethiopian was transported alive into paradise,<ref>"Derek Ere? Zu??a," i. end</ref> an occurrence that, like the translation of Elijah,<ref>II Kings ii. 11</ref> must have taken place by means of a "vehiculum." Another reminiscence of the Jewish legend is found in Baruch-Zoroaster's words concerning Jesus: "He shall descend from my family",<ref>''[[Book of the Bee]]'', ed. Budge, p. 90, line 5, London, 1886</ref> since, according to the [[Haggadah]], Baruch was a priest; and [[Virgin Mary|Maria]], the mother of Jesus, was of priestly family.
 
The Arabic-Christian legends identify Baruch with [[Zoroaster]], and give much information concerning him. Baruch, angry because the gift of prophecy had been denied him, and on account of the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple, left Palestine to found the religion of Zoroaster. The prophecy of the birth of [[Jesus]] from a virgin, and of his adoration by the [[Magi]], is also ascribed to Baruch-Zoroaster.<ref>Compare the complete collection of these legends in Gottheil, in "Classical Studies in Honor of H. Drisler," pp. 24-51, New York, 1894; Jackson, "Zoroaster," pp. 17, 165 et seq.</ref> It is difficult to explain the origin of this curious identification of a prophet with a magician, such as Zoroaster was held to be, among the Jews, [[Christian]]s, and Arabs. De Sacy<ref>"Notices et Extraits des MSS. de la Bibliothèque du Roi," ii. 319</ref> explains it on the ground that in Arabic the name of the prophet Jeremiah is almost identical with that of the city of Urmiah, where, it is said, Zoroaster lived. However, this may be, the Jewish legend mentioned above (under Baruch in Rabbinical Literature), according to which the Ethiopian in Jer. xxxviii. 7 is undoubtedly identical with Baruch, is connected with this Arabic-Christian legend. As early as the Clementine "Recognitiones" (iv. 27), Zoroaster was believed to be a descendant of [[Ham (son of Noah)|Ham]]; and, according to Gen. x. 6, Cush, the Ethiopian, is a son of Ham. According to the "Recognitiones",<ref>iv. 28</ref> the Persians believed that Zoroaster had been taken into heaven in a chariot ("ad cœlum vehiculo sublevatum"); and according to the Jewish legend, the above-mentioned Ethiopian was transported alive into paradise,<ref>"Derek Ere? Zu??a," i. end</ref> an occurrence that, like the translation of Elijah,<ref>II Kings ii. 11</ref> must have taken place by means of a "vehiculum." Another reminiscence of the Jewish legend is found in Baruch-Zoroaster's words concerning Jesus: "He shall descend from my family",<ref>''[[Book of the Bee]]'', ed. Budge, p. 90, line 5, London, 1886</ref> since, according to the [[Haggadah]], Baruch was a priest; and [[Virgin Mary|Maria]], the mother of Jesus, was of priestly family.
   
In the [[Eastern Orthodox Church]] Baruch is venerated as a [[saint]], and as such is commemorated on September 28 (which, for those who follow the traditional [[Julian Calendar]], falls on October 11 of the [[Gregorian Calendar]]).
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In the [[Eastern Orthodox Church]] Baruch is venerated as a [[saint]], and as such is commemorated on September 28 (which, for those who follow the traditional [[Julian Calendar]], falls on October 11 of the [[Gregorian Calendar]]). KISSS BUTTT ALL DAY LONG
   
 
==Historicity==
 
==Historicity==
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