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ID:933091
User:195.195.5.19
Article:CD-ROM
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(Media)
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==Media==
 
==Media==
 
{{Main|Compact Disc}}
 
{{Main|Compact Disc}}
CD-ROM discs are identical in appearance to [[Compact Disc|audio CDs]], and data are stored and retrieved in a very similar manner (only differing from audio CDs in the standards used to store the data). Discs are made from a 1.2 mm thick disc of [[polycarbonate]] [[plastic]], with a thin layer of [[aluminium]] to make a reflective surface. The most common size of CD-ROM disc is 120 mm in diameter, though the smaller [[Mini CD]] standard with an 80 mm diameter, as well as numerous non-standard sizes and shapes (e.g., business card-sized media) are also available.
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CD-ROM discs are identical in appearance to [[Compact Disc|audio CDs]], and data are stored and retrieved in a very similar manner (only differing from audio CDs in the standards used to store the data). Discs are made from a 1.2 mm thick disc of [[polycarbonate]] [[plastic]], with a thin layer of [[aluminium]] to make a reflective surface. The most common size of CD-ROM disc is 120 mm in diameter, though the smaller [[Mini CD]] standard with an 80 mm diameter, as well as numerous non-standard sizes and shapes (e.g., business card-sized media) are also available. It sa me Mario!
   
 
Data is stored on the disc as a series of microscopic indentations. A [[laser]] is shone onto the reflective surface of the disc to read the pattern of pits and lands ("pits", with the gaps between them referred to as "lands"). Because the depth of the pits is approximately one-quarter to one-sixth of the wavelength of the laser light used to read the disc, the reflected [[Light beam|beam]]'s [[phase (waves)|phase]] is shifted in relation to the incoming beam, causing [[destructive interference]] and reducing the reflected beam's intensity. This pattern of changing intensity of the reflected beam is converted into binary data.
 
Data is stored on the disc as a series of microscopic indentations. A [[laser]] is shone onto the reflective surface of the disc to read the pattern of pits and lands ("pits", with the gaps between them referred to as "lands"). Because the depth of the pits is approximately one-quarter to one-sixth of the wavelength of the laser light used to read the disc, the reflected [[Light beam|beam]]'s [[phase (waves)|phase]] is shifted in relation to the incoming beam, causing [[destructive interference]] and reducing the reflected beam's intensity. This pattern of changing intensity of the reflected beam is converted into binary data.
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