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ID:958619
User:81.30.240.226
Article:Susan B. Anthony
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(Reverted 2 edits by 168.11.153.71 (talk). (TW))
(Early life)
(Tag: repeating characters)
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[[File:Susan B Anthony Birthplace.jpg|thumb|right|Susan B. Anthony's birthplace]]
 
[[File:Susan B Anthony Birthplace.jpg|thumb|right|Susan B. Anthony's birthplace]]
   
Her earliest American ancestors were the immigrants John Anthony (1607–1675), who was from [[Hempstead, Essex]], and his wife, Susanna Potter (c. 1623 - 1674), who was from [[London, Middlesex]].
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Her earliest American ancestors were the immigrants John Anthony (1607–1675), who was from [[Hempstead, Essex]], and his wife, Susanna Potter (c. 1623 - 1674), who was from [[London, Middlesex]].kjdfhjhdfs kdfhkj jk dfjk kjsdfkjeiuskjsfdjkfd21jkdfs6d52
   
Anthony's father Daniel was a cotton manufacturer and [[abolitionist]], a stern but open-minded man who was born into the [[Quaker]] religion.<ref name=Harper1899v1>{{Cite book| last= Harper | first= Ida Husted | authorlink= Ida Husted Harper | title= The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony: including public addresses, her own letters and many from her contemporaries during fifty years | publisher= The Bowen-Merrill Company| year= 1899 | location= Indianapolis & Kansas City| pages= 21–22 (n62–63 in electronic page field) |volume=Vol. 1 | url= http://www.archive.org/details/lifeandworksusa00unkngoog | accessdate=22 January 2010}} Full text at Internet Archive.</ref> He did not allow toys or amusements into the household, claiming that they would distract the soul from the "[[inner light]]." Her mother, Lucy, was a student in Daniel's school; the two fell in love and agreed to marry in 1817, but Lucy was less sure about marrying into the [[Society of Friends]] (Quakers). Lucy attended the Rochester women’s rights convention held in August 1848, two weeks after the historic [[Seneca Falls Convention]], and signed the Rochester convention’s Declaration of Sentiments. Lucy and Daniel Anthony enforced self-discipline, principled convictions, and belief in one's own [[self-worth]].
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Anthony's father Daniel was a cotton manufacturer and [[abolitionist]], a stern but open-minded man who was born into the [[Quaker]] religion.<ref name=Harper1899v1>{{Cite book| last= Harper | first= Ida Husted | authorlink= Ida Husted Harper | title= The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony: including public addresses, her own letters and many from her contemporaries during fifty years | publisher= The Bowen-Merrill Company| year= 1899 | location= Indianapolis & Kansas City| pages= 21–22 (n62–63 in electronic page field) |volume=Vol. 1 | url= http://www.archive.org/details/lifeandworksusa00unkngoog | accessdate=22 January 2010}} Full text at Internet Archive.</ref> He did not allow toys or amusements into the household, claiming that they would distract the soul from the "[[inner light]]." Her mother, Lucy, was a student in Daniel's school; the two fell in love and agreed to marry in 1817, but Lucy was less sure about marrying into the [[Society of Friends]] (Quakers). Lucy attended the Rochester women’s rights convention held in August 1848, two weeks after the historic [[Seneca Falls Convention]], and signed the Rochester convention’s Declaration of Sentiments. Lucy and Daniel Anthony enforced self-discipline, principled convictions, and belief in one's own [[self-worth]]. fgjfhds
   
 
Susan was a precocious child, having learned to read and write at age three.<ref name=Harper1899p13>Harper (1899) Vol.1, pp.13–14.</ref> In 1826, when she was six years old, the Anthony family moved from [[Massachusetts]] to [[Battenville, New York]]. Susan was sent to attend a local district school, where a teacher refused to teach her [[long division]] because of her gender. Upon learning of the weak education she was receiving, her father promptly had her placed in a group [[home school]], where he taught Susan himself. Mary Perkins, another teacher there, conveyed a progressive image of womanhood to Anthony, further fostering her growing belief in women's equality.
 
Susan was a precocious child, having learned to read and write at age three.<ref name=Harper1899p13>Harper (1899) Vol.1, pp.13–14.</ref> In 1826, when she was six years old, the Anthony family moved from [[Massachusetts]] to [[Battenville, New York]]. Susan was sent to attend a local district school, where a teacher refused to teach her [[long division]] because of her gender. Upon learning of the weak education she was receiving, her father promptly had her placed in a group [[home school]], where he taught Susan himself. Mary Perkins, another teacher there, conveyed a progressive image of womanhood to Anthony, further fostering her growing belief in women's equality.
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