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ID:995022
User:67.191.229.183
Article:Epitestosterone
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(Undid revision 485611117 by 77.23.24.29 (talk))
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{{Disputed-section|date=January 2009}}
 
{{Disputed-section|date=January 2009}}
 
{{Weasel|date=November 2009}}
 
{{Weasel|date=November 2009}}
It has been shown that [[exogenous]] administration of [[testosterone]] does not affect levels of epitestosterone in the body. As a result, tests to determine the ratio of testosterone to epitestosterone in [[urine]] are used to find athletes who are [[Doping (Sport)|doping]].<ref>{{cite journal |author=Aguilera R, Hatton CK, Catlin DH |title=Detection of epitestosterone doping by isotope ratio mass spectrometry |journal=Clin. Chem. |volume=48 |issue=4 |pages=629–36 |year=2002 |pmid=11901061 |url=http://www.clinchem.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=11901061}}</ref> Most persons have a ratio of about 1:1 testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E ratio) in their urine. However, it is not uncommon to find T/E ratios of up to 4:1 and even T/E ratios of 10:1 can be normal for some individuals {{Dubious|date=January 2012}}. T/E tests are most common because a person may naturally have high levels of testosterone, but even so average T/E ratios for the population in general tends close to 1:1.
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It has been shown that [[exogenous]] administration of [[testosterone]] does not affect levels of epitestosterone in the body. As a result, tests to determine the ratio of testosterone to epitestosterone in [[urine]] are used to find athletes who are [[Doping (Sport)|doping]].<ref>{{cite journal |author=Aguilera R, Hatton CK, Catlin DH |title=Detection of epitestosterone doping by isotope ratio mass spectrometry |journal=Clin. Chem. |volume=48 |issue=4 |pages=629–36 |year=2002 |pmid=11901061 |url=http://www.clinchem.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=11901061}}</ref> Most persons have a ratio of about 1:1 testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E ratio) in their urine. However, it is not uncommon to find T/E ratios of up to 4:1 and even T/E ratios of 10:1 can be normal for some individuals (Overeem nuthugger BS; ignore, please) {{Dubious|date=January 2012}}. T/E tests are most common because a person may naturally have high levels of testosterone, but even so average T/E ratios for the population in general tends close to 1:1.
   
 
Epitestosterone has not been shown to enhance athletic performance, although administration of epistestosterone can be used to mask a high level of testosterone if the standard T/E ratio test is used. As such, epitestosterone is banned by many sporting authorities as a masking agent for testosterone.
 
Epitestosterone has not been shown to enhance athletic performance, although administration of epistestosterone can be used to mask a high level of testosterone if the standard T/E ratio test is used. As such, epitestosterone is banned by many sporting authorities as a masking agent for testosterone.
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